• Short Summary

    In the United States, sandwich maker Jim McElwee is building sandwiches large enough for even the biggest American appetite.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Sign "Mac's Hoagies' - Cafe
    0.03

    2.
    SV PAN Mac serving young customers
    0.10

    3.
    CU Advertisement on display for Mac's The Kong' Hoagie
    0.16

    4.
    SCU Mac speaks
    1.07

    5.
    CU ZOOM OUT Mac tieing ribbons round 11 ft. 'Hogaie' on table
    1.15


    JIM McELWEE "Yeach, Make the largest selection of 'hoagies' in America. We have over a hundred an fifty. We are going to make two hundred then stop. So I decided to make an eleven foot Hoagie which is the biggest Hoagie ever made in American and its filled with the whole schmeer, lettuce, tomatoes and meat and it's little over eleven feet long. It's the biggest Hoagie ever made and we're real proud of it.



    We name some of the Hoagies after people we either admire or dislike as you'll note by our menu board and what I'm working on now is 'the kong' and this is the biggest sub sold every day in America. There's over fifty slices of meat in it plus a whole mass of other stuff. It's really, if I was an artist I'd probably be, you know, famous."




    Initials SC/1929 SC/1939



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In the United States, sandwich maker Jim McElwee is building sandwiches large enough for even the biggest American appetite. His biggest is over eleven feet (3 metres) long.

    The big sandwiches are called 'hoagies'. Mr. McElwee's eleven foot giant consists of various types of garlic sausage, lettuce and tomatoes inside a continuous bread roll.

    A hundred and fifty varieties of 'hoagies' are one sale at "Mac 's Hoagies" stand in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. Max Owner, who bought the stand, is hoping Jim McEliwee will be able to increase the range of 'hoagies' to two hundred.

    The Hoagies are named after famous people that Mr. Owner and Jim McElwee either like of dislike. One 'Hoagie' named after former Vice President Spiro Agnew is advertised 'with a 25 per cent kick back'.

    The film includes a commentary by Television News reporter Andy Macmillan and remarks by sandwich maker Jim McElwee.

    An alternative commentary is provided overleaf. A transcript of Mr. McElwee's remarks follows.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABH32PZHHYBXF8RTPC4VXPAVQC
    Media URN:
    VLVABH32PZHHYBXF8RTPC4VXPAVQC
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    30/05/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:14:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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