• Short Summary

    David Sibeka, a South African and a spokesman for the Pan Africa Congress on Azania - the African name for South Africa - commented on the South African riots at a United Nations news conference on Tuesday (22 June).

  • Description

    1.
    GV: UN building
    0.08

    2.
    SV: Sibeka speaking
    1.10

    3.
    GV: reporters taking notes
    1.18

    4.
    Sibeka speaking
    2.46


    SIBEKA: "It has to be appreciated and recognised that the uprising in Azania is unique in the annals of African liberation struggle. Completely relying on themselves and with the most primitive weapons, the African masses have taken on the most sophisticated military machine in the continent of Africa. Largely untaught in the skills of urban guerrilla warfare, Africans are learning in the field and distinguishing themselves. Typically of their creativeness in the struggle in what was observed by a Reuter correspondent in Pretoria yesterday. How large groups quickly dispersed and proved difficult targets when police advanced and how children have taught themselves to counter teargas bombs by covering their mouths and noses and eyes with handkerchiefs".



    "We find it really a pity that the Secretary of State continues to play into the hands of the South African propaganda machinery. If we look at how this whole exercise was invented and how it has been played, if I may detain you members of the press, it was first sprung very deliberately in a very carefully set up interview between (indistinct), who is well-known publisher who is carrying big investments into South Africa and personal friend of Colonel (indistinct) South Africa and personal friend of Colonel (indistinct) South African Minister of Information, during an interview with President Ford in the media somewhere. And then the idea of contact between the United States of America President and South Africa's racist premier was put as a kite flown around and the end result of this is this coming together of Kissinger and Vorster. And the whole thing has been portrayed in South Africa as a diplomatic breakthrough for Vorster and not a breakthrough for the people of Zimbabwe - this is what it has been portrayed as. And but for the Soweto uprising Vorster would have got away with yet another cosmetic for his apartheid policies - deliberately engineered and master-minded by skilled right-wing propagandiate in this country - and in South Africa".



    On Saturday (19 June) the United Nations Security council unanimously condemned the South African government for "massive violence" against African people. In a rare display of unity, the 15-nation council approved the resolution by consensus without a vote. The resolution also reaffirmed that apartheid was a "crime against the conscience and dignity of mankind and seriously disturbs international peace and security".




    Initials RH/MF/AH/2340


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: David Sibeka, a South African and a spokesman for the Pan Africa Congress on Azania - the African name for South Africa - commented on the South African riots at a United Nations news conference on Tuesday (22 June).

    SYNOPSIS: He spoke with enthusiasm about black African urban protestors demonstrating their feelings against the full weight of the South African security forces.

    Mr. Sibeka was then asked about United States Secretary of Stage Henry Kissinger's forthcoming talks with South African premier John Vorster.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAB96CGNRSJ6YOM92PW7C68LYN4
    Media URN:
    VLVAB96CGNRSJ6YOM92PW7C68LYN4
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/06/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:47:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment