• Short Summary

    The Channel tide rolled back to its furthest point this century at Mont St Michel, on the Brittany Coast, yesterday (Monday) revealing stones from neolithic and prehistoric graveyards, but no evidence of legendary lost cities.

  • Description

    The Channel tide rolled back to its furthest point this century at Mont St Michel, on the Brittany Coast, yesterday (Monday) revealing stones from neolithic and prehistoric graveyards, but no evidence of legendary lost cities. Bad weather frustrated hundreds of people who had hoped to follow the tide out along the coast and discover wrecks of 17th Century galleons and of the 1944 D-Day armada.

    Strong winds lashed the receding waves, heavy rains fell and the newly uncovered sands were treacherous underfoot.

    The tide receded about six miles (10 kilometres) at the funnel-shaped bay of Mont St Michel, where the coasts of Normandy and Brittany meet, as a result of an exceptional gravitational pull of the sun and moon in line with each other at the Spring equinox.

    Police warned the thousands of sightseers swarming through coastal fishing towns and villages to retreat well before the tide swept back at up to 19 miles per hour (30 k.p.h.).

    By mid-afternoon no accidents had been reported by police helicopters hovering over the beaches to guard against people becoming trapped in the quicksand. Monster traffic jams developed as tourists flocked to the area to watch the phenomenon.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAB39CW3HJ5Z9YYL3LMBHVAYOJU
    Media URN:
    VLVAB39CW3HJ5Z9YYL3LMBHVAYOJU
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/03/1967
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:15:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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