• Short Summary

    In Thailand the rising cost of medical care is rapidly placing even basic treatment for chronic ailment out of the reach of the country's largely poor population.

  • Description

    In Thailand the rising cost of medical care is rapidly placing even basic treatment for chronic ailment out of the reach of the country's largely poor population. Being blamed is the increasing reliance on expensive modern drugs which have to be imported. In a bid to stop the dependence on modern antibiotics Thai health authorities are trying to revive the use of organic medicines derived from local plants and trees.

    In Thailand, the skyrocketing cost of medical care is rapidly placing even adequate treatment for chronic ailments, out of the reach of the country's largely poor population.being blamed is the increasing reliance on expensive modern drugs which have to be imported.

    In a move to change the situation, efforts are now underway to re-popularise the use of local organic medicines. The countries old practice of deriving cures from plants and trees, once widespread throughout Thailand, has been steadily losing out to the onslaught of modern antibiotics and other manufactured drugs.

    SYNOPSIS: In Ban Beong village, 140 kms (85 miles) south of Bangkok, 80 to 90 per cent of the people suffer from intestinal parasites caused by hookworms. The debilitating effect of the condition is common through-out the tropics. The villagers exist largely on subsistence farming and have little money to spare for the purchase of modern drugs to cure the illness. As a result most go without treatment. But now the Thai Family Planning Service, helped by Japanese medical technologists, has launched a campaign in Ban Beong to demonstrate the effectiveness and low cost of using treatments processed from local plants. In this case villagers are introduced to "Maklua", a medicine made from the fruit of the ebony tree. The cost of the treatment is only about 10 US cents. The bitter tasting fruit juice acts as a cleansing agent and washes the parasites from the intestinal system.

    Its pointed out to the villagers that making "Maklua" is very simple. The ebony fruit, produced seven years after a tree is planted, are crushed and added to water.

    The juice is then filtered several times and boiled until the froth disappears. The finished product is then served-up to the villagers in doses of half a drinking glass. "Maklua" has been used in the cure of parasites for more than a century by people in north east Thailand where ebony trees are common. The Family Planning Service says similar demonstrations are planned for other villages throughout Thailand and its hoped the programme will improve the health and welfare of the rural population.

    In Ean Beong village, 142 km south o Bangkok, 80 to 90 per cent of the inhabitants suffer from intestinal parasites caused by hookworms. The debilitating affliction is common throughout the tropics.

    The people of Ban Beong exist largely on subsistence farming. And with little money to spare as a result, the purchase of modern drugs to cure the illness is all but impossible. In the end most go without treatment.

    But now Family Planning Service of Thailand with the help of Japanese medical technologists, have launched a drive in the village to demonstrate the effectiveness and low cost of using treatments processed from local plants.

    In this case, villagers are introduced to "Maklua", a medicine made from the fruit of an ebony tree. The cost for the treatment is only about ten US cents.

    The bitter tasting ebony fruit juice induces diarrhea which helps to flush out the parasites from the intestinal tract. (SEQ 1-4)
    Its pointed out to the villagers that making Maklua is very simple. The ebony fruits, which are produced seven years after a tree is planted, are crushed and added to water. (SEQ 5-7)
    The juice is then screened several times and boiled until the froth disappears.

    The finished product is served up to the villagers in doses of half a drinking glass. Maklua has been used in the cure of parasites for more than a century, mostly by the people in north east Thailand where ebony trees are common.

    The Family Planning Service said similar demonstrations will be launched in other villages throughout Thailand. It is hoped that the programme will improve the health and welfare of the rural population.(SEQ 8-9)

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAB1G2JYMJPI1VYPT33AC3U3W4W
    Media URN:
    VLVAB1G2JYMJPI1VYPT33AC3U3W4W
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    06/09/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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