• Short Summary

    New York's Staten Island Ferry is an institution to the thousands of commuters who daily use it to cross from the island to lower Manhattan The sole survivor of more than two dozen lines which flourished throughout the latter part of the last century - before the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge - the Staten Island line's seven diesel engined passenger and car carriers run a round-the-clock service, ferrying 70,000 people a day.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Ferry passing Status of Liberty
    0.08

    2.
    GV New York skyline, passengers on deck
    0.26

    3.
    CV Man on deck being interviewed. (SOUND)
    1.14

    4.
    SV Another man interviewed. (SOUND)
    1.44

    5.
    CV Tourist... Connecticut man interviewed (SOUND)
    2.13

    6.
    SV People leaving ferry (3 shots)
    2.29

    7.
    CV Slot meter on turnstile
    2.34

    8.
    SV People going through turnstile... PAN TO sign Fare 5 Cents.
    2.48


    TRANSCRIPT: (SEQ. 4): REPORTER: "Sir, are you a commuter?"



    COMMUTER: "Yes, I am."



    REPORTER: "Both ways?"



    COMMUTER: "Every day, twice a day, back and forth to New York City."



    REPORTER: "You live on Staten Island?"



    COMMUTER: "Yeah."



    REPORTER: "Would you pay more than a nickel?"



    COMMUTER: "Ah, it depends on how much it will go up. I don't know. People get so used to the idea of a nickel that they don't ever want to see it get raised. Maybe ten cents or a quarter at the most. I couldn't see anything more than that."



    REPORTER: "Would you still ride the ferry?"



    COMMUTER: "Oh yeah, I really have no choice unless you want to drive into Manhattan, and in the morning it is almost impossible with the traffic going over the Verrazano Bridge and through the Battery Park Tunnel. The Ferry is the most convenient way and the cheapest way to get into the city."



    REPORTER: "Sir do you use the Staten Island ferry often?"



    MAN: "Not often. I used to use it a lot before, during the war."



    REPORTER: "And how much was the fare then?"



    MAN: "Five Cents."



    REPORTER: "And its now?"



    MAN: "Five cents."



    REPORTER: "Would you pay more to ride the ferry?"



    MAN: "Being what it is, surely I would pay a quarter if need be."



    REPORTER: "What is it?"



    MAN: "Five cents."



    REPORTER: "No, what I mean, you say, being what it is, what do you mean?"



    MAN: "Everything is high, everything is so high, that they can pay a quarter or thirty cents for the subway, they could pay a quarter for the ferry."



    REPORTER: "Thank you."



    REPORTER: "Do you ride the ferry often, Sir?"



    TOURIST: "No, not really, I am from Connecticut. We are just visiting down here."



    REPORTER: "So you are taking the ferry for sightseeing?"



    TOURIST: "Really."



    REPORTER: "Did you do anything on Staten Island while you were there?"



    TOURIST: "Turned around and came back."



    REPORTER: "Right. But you are not out on deck."



    TOURIST: "No, we are going out to see the skyline."



    REPORTER: "What do you say to the nickel fare?"



    TOURIST: "Oh, I think its great."



    REPORTER: "Would it be worth more than that to you?"



    TOURIST: "Oh, I think it probably would."



    REPORTER: "Thank you sir."




    Initials SGM/1832 BB/2141 RR/AS/BB/2207



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: New York's Staten Island Ferry is an institution to the thousands of commuters who daily use it to cross from the island to lower Manhattan The sole survivor of more than two dozen lines which flourished throughout the latter part of the last century - before the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge - the Staten Island line's seven diesel engined passenger and car carriers run a round-the-clock service, ferrying 70,000 people a day. Sixty thousand are carried during the commuter rush periods. The remainder are tourists, children, and retired men and women who make the crossing to take in one of New York's few bargains in entertainment - the sights and sounds of New York harbour, combined with a breath of fresh salt air.

    For this, they still pay only 5 cents for the trip - exactly what it cost seventy years ago. The cheapness of the ticket is in itself an integral part of the fascination which this much-loved institution has always held for New Yorkers, for there is little left in life that can be bought for 5 cents except a ride on the Staten Island Ferry.

    But the historic nickel-a-head fare could be coming to an end. The line costs an annual 16 million dollars to run. And the seventy year old fare brings in only two million dollars inclusive of the higher rates charged for vehicles. Economic pressure has already forced a cutback in services. But the New York City Council has resisted several proposals from Mayor John Lindsay's administration that the ferry ride should be increased to 25 cents. In view of the simple mathematics involved, however, they could be fighting a losing battle.

    This Visnews production, with interviews shows what New York commuters and tourists think of their five-cent ferry.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAB1DTH5B6I65IUSCTSQA2VI0V9
    Media URN:
    VLVAB1DTH5B6I65IUSCTSQA2VI0V9
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/06/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:49:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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