• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: An exhibition has opened in Hong Kong of ancient treasures from the old Imperial Palace in Peking.

  • Description

    1.
    GV ZOOM IN EXTERIOR Exhibition site in Hong Kong
    0.10

    2.
    GV ZOOM INTO CU Gold saddle with jewels in glass case
    0.22

    3.
    SV People looking at wall paintings
    0.26

    4.
    LV Gold Bhuddist Pagoda inlaid with jewels
    0.29

    5.
    SV ZOOM OUT TO GV Gold Goddess of Mercy
    0.38

    6.
    CU ZOOM OUT GV Gold Bhuddist pagoda inlaid with jewels
    0.53

    7.
    GV Gold clock
    1.00

    8.
    SV Elephant shaped enamel incense burner
    1.04

    9.
    GV Imperial throne of Qian Long
    1.09

    10.
    CU ZOOM OUT Various imperials seals in jade and gold (2 shots)
    1.26

    11.
    SVs Partition with jade carving
    1.41

    12.
    SV Security guard
    1.44

    13.
    CU ZOOM IN Gold chimes
    1.54

    14.
    SV People buying at souvenir counter
    2.02

    15.
    Security guards on main entrance
    2.06




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: An exhibition has opened in Hong Kong of ancient treasures from the old Imperial Palace in Peking. The palace is now a museum, and the relics housed there attract hundreds of thousands of art lovers and tourists every year.

    SYNOPSIS: But for one month a selection of the exhibits have been brought to Hong Kong. The people here and from neighbouring Macao will have a chance to see some of the fabulous treasures of the Chinese emperors.

    The exhibition includes court paintings of the Ming and Qing dynasties, which ruled China from the 14th to the 20th centuries, and the gold Goddess of Mercy which dates from the 18th century.

    Also on show is a Buddhist pagoda, which would have a stood in the Imperial Palace as a shrine, where the Emperors and Empresses would say their prayers.

    There are antique clocks and watches in the exhibition, pottery, jewellery, armour and other artifacts.

    This sandalwood throne belonged to Emperor Qian Long, the fourth emperor of the Qing dynasty. He was also responsible for the inscription of the imperial seals, which are made out of jade and gold. The seals symbolised the emperors' power.

    Jade began to be used very widely around the middle of the Qing dynasty, that is towards the end of the 18th century. The stone was carved into a variety of ornamental objects, from enormous sculptures to the most delicate jewellery pieces.

    The Qing dynasty also produced the gold chimes, used to provide music during court ceremonies.

    The exhibition will be open to the public until the beginning of May. Until then the people of Hong Kong have at their disposal a cultural display rarely seen outside Peking.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAZZ7OONE1ANDIIUV7YDJSBTY3
    Media URN:
    VLVAAZZ7OONE1ANDIIUV7YDJSBTY3
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/04/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment