• Short Summary

    In Sweden, people have been voting in General Elections on Sunday -- a time when the country is still in deep mourning for its late King Gustaf Adolf who died on Saturday night (15 September).

  • Description

    In Sweden, people have been voting in General Elections on Sunday -- a time when the country is still in deep mourning for its late King Gustaf Adolf who died on Saturday night (15 September).

    With a third of the results in, political experts in Stockholm were saying that the opposition non-Socialist had a good chance of winning. This would mean an end to Social-Democrat rule in Sweden after 41 years.

    The Prime Minister, Mr Olaf Palme, commented that he thought the Social Democrats had fought strongly from a losing position but admitted that it seemed doubtful that this would be enough.

    On the basis of the first 1,908 voting district results, the opposition bloc of Centro, Conservative and Liberal Parties was tipped to gain 176 seats in the 350 seat Parliament -- a two vote lead over the combined Social Democrat and Communist Party seats.

    The most likely man to become Prime Minister should the opposition bloc come to power is said to be Centre Party leader Thorbjoern Faelldin, aged 47.

    The main issues in the campaign have been unemployment and high taxes but the elections are also a big personal test for Mr Palme who took over the Social Democrat leadership three years ago and still has not won full support from the rank and file.

    In the country as a whole, polls show that Mr Faelldin would be preferred as Prime Minister.

    SYNOPSIS: In Stockholm, flags fly at half-mast for Sweden's late King Gustaf Adolf, who died aged ninety on Saturday night. Meanwhile people go to the polls to vote in the country's General Elections. The campaign was a closely fought one, but somewhat lacking in life with the main issues being unemployment and high taxes as well as the side issue of law and order, prompted by the recent Stockholm bank seige after a gunman held three people hostage.

    Despite this, a high turn-out was expected -- of about ninety-per cent with a very close result on the books.

    For Prime Minister Olaf Palme, it was a big personal test. He took over the leadership of his party, the Social Democrats, three years ago and still hasn't won full rank and file support. If his party new loses -- and with a third of the result in, it is predicted to do so narrowly -- it'll be the end of forty-one years in power for them.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAWP2RKCDKV30JVF7DLNJH7WAA
    Media URN:
    VLVAAWP2RKCDKV30JVF7DLNJH7WAA
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    16/09/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:09:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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