• Short Summary

    There is a strong likelihood that Zambia's only daily newspaper, the Times of Zambia, will come into the news shortly if, as seems probable, the Government nationalises or bans it, thus eliminating the last vestige of criticism in this country, mild though it is. (The Government already controls radio and television.) There is also the possibility of sabotage by the more violent members of the ruling United National Independence Party.

  • Description

    1.
    GV the Times of Zambia building in Kabalenga Avenue, Ndola.


    2.
    Inside, row of linotype type-setting machines.


    3.
    CU linotype operator setting type on machine.


    4.
    Compositors make up galleys of type.


    5.
    In the editorial department, GV the sub-editors' table -- chief sub-editor seated at far end.


    6.
    Reporters typing, on phone, etc. (Africans)


    7.
    Another view of the subs' table.


    8.
    The sports sub checks something in newspaper.


    9.
    In printing department, part of the rotary printing press, TILT DOWN to newspapers "hot off the press".


    10.
    Part of the rotary, showing poor being printed.


    11.
    Printer checks a copy of the paper, while bundles are being moved from machine for distribution.


    12.
    TILT DOWN from limp Zambian flag (outside Ndola's post office) to newspaper vendor's sitting on steps.


    13.
    Man buys newspaper from vendors.




    Initials


    This coverage is accompanied by 1/4 in. tape (71/2 ips) of the sound of the rotary printing press in operation.

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: There is a strong likelihood that Zambia's only daily newspaper, the Times of Zambia, will come into the news shortly if, as seems probable, the Government nationalises or bans it, thus eliminating the last vestige of criticism in this country, mild though it is. (The Government already controls radio and television.) There is also the possibility of sabotage by the more violent members of the ruling United National Independence Party. Nearly every day the Government issues a Press release refuting some item that has appeared in the morning's paper -- items, moreover, that are in any case correct. Matters, therefore, look as if they are coming to a head. The paper is hated by Europeans and reviled by Africans; Europeans because they consider what criticism of the Government there is not strong enough, and Africans because they regard the paper as the Europeans' (therefor racialists') mouthpiece -- and in this they are becoming increasingly vociferous. The Times of Zambia is owned by the Lonrho Group, the financial concern that incidentally also owns the oil pipeline from Beira to Umtali, Rhodesia, much in the news in the months following Rhodesia's UDI. It has a daily circulation of about 40,000, with a sister paper, the Zambia News, circulation 33,000, published on Sundays. Its editor is Richard Hall, an Englishman who has taken out Zambian nationality papers. Most of the editorial staff is European but there are three African reporters and one African sub-editor. Andrew Mutemba, Minister of State for the Western Province (which includes the whole of Zambia's Copperbelt), is currently waging a campaign against the paper.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAU15HLONEWLNIGH3V65M7SAC6
    Media URN:
    VLVAAU15HLONEWLNIGH3V65M7SAC6
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/03/1967
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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