• Short Summary

    Indian Hindu nationalist leader Atal Behari Vajpayes, who has since been arrested for illegally crossing the Indo-Pakistan border, first intensified his campaign against the recent Simla border agreement on Tuesday (July 25) -- when he led more than a thousand of his followers across the border into Pakistani territory held by India since the war last December
    The incident took place at Gadra -- a remote point on the Indo-pakistan border on the frontier with pakistan's Sind Province, where India made its largest gains in the war over Bangladesh.

  • Description

    Indian Hindu nationalist leader Atal Behari Vajpayes, who has since been arrested for illegally crossing the Indo-Pakistan border, first intensified his campaign against the recent Simla border agreement on Tuesday (July 25) -- when he led more than a thousand of his followers across the border into Pakistani territory held by India since the war last December
    The incident took place at Gadra -- a remote point on the Indo-pakistan border on the frontier with pakistan's Sind Province, where India made its largest gains in the war over Bangladesh. At this point, Gadra Road Town stands on the Indian side of the border, and the ruined Gadra City lies on the Indian-controlled Pakistani side.

    Vajpayee, who addressed a rally in Gadra Town before setting off to lead Tuesday's mass march to the border, argued with indian frontier officials for some time before going across. Once in Gadra City ruins, however, Indian authorities escorted him back across the border, held him in detention for some hours, and released him. On Wednesday (July 26), he was again arrested while riding a camel across the frontier at nearby Barmer.

    Part of the recent agreement at Simla, where Indian Premier Mrs. Indira gandhi and Pakistani President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto talked in summit for several days before reaching accord, was that both countries should withdraw from all areas they captured from one another in the war -- with the exception of Kashmir, where the December cease-fire line was to be observed. The result was that India was to withdraw its troops from some 5,000 square miles of territory (8,000 square kilometres) -- and Pakistan would surrender 50 square miles (80 square kilometres).

    But the Hindu nationalist party Jan Sangh, under the leadership of Vajpayse, called the agreement 'a sell-out' and pledged to send volunteers to the captured territories and launch country-wide demonstrations and hunger strikes to rouse public opinion against the agreement.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAS2WLA5O42FKZU64VB8K7DPLC
    Media URN:
    VLVAAS2WLA5O42FKZU64VB8K7DPLC
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    27/07/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:34:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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