• Short Summary

    MATABELELAND, ZIMBABWE

    The Zimbabwe government has denied churchmen's allegations of widespread army excesses in Matabeleland Province, and claimed instead that atrocities were being committed by rebels posing as government forces.

  • Description

    BBC: (MARCH 31):
    1. SV PULL BACK TO GV/GVs Deserted village (3 shots) 0.15
    2. SV Burnt utensils and shoe on ground (2 shots) 0.28
    3. SVs Man lying on bed, with huge wound and welt marks covering his entire back (3 shots) 0.37
    4. CUs Man with long knife wound on chest (2 shots) 0.46
    5. SV Wounded people in hospital bed 0.51
    6. SV/CU Young girl with bullet wound in back (2 shots) 1.06
    7. SVs Woman holding injured baby (2 shots) 1.30
    ABC: (APRIL 1):
    8. GVs Rally organised by ZANU Party (3 shots) 1.45
    9. SVs PAN Alleged dissidents handcuffed, being presented at rally 1.55
    10. SV/PAN Weapons on show, and young alleged dissidents saying they belong to ZIPRA forces (6 shots) 2.59
    InitialsSH/BB


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: MATABELELAND, ZIMBABWE

    The Zimbabwe government has denied churchmen's allegations of widespread army excesses in Matabeleland Province, and claimed instead that atrocities were being committed by rebels posing as government forces. In a recent pastoral statement, the country's seven Roman Catholic bishops charged that troops engaged in anti-rebel operations were carrying out acts of wanton killing, beating, burning and rape. Patients in a local Matabeleland hospital claim their wounds were inflicted by government troops. A 60-year-old man said he was beaten by soldiers who accused him of helping dissidents. This 16-year-old girl said she was shot in the back by men in military uniforms who swept through her village and killed 50 people. Not even the very young have been spared in the conflict: an injured child was found suckling on her dead mother's breast, after an alleged military raid. The government of Prime Minister Robert Mugabe has been trying to clear the reputation of the North Korean-trained Fifth Brigade, sent to Matabeleland to crush unrest said to be caused by forces faithful to former Opposition leader Joshua N'komo, who has since fled Zimbabwe. By placing captured dissidents on display at town rallies, and making them confess publicly their affiliation with Mr N'komo's Zapu Party, the government hoped to regain the trust of the local population. Yet, there is little evidence that the display of captured weapons, and appeals from cabinet ministers, have so far achieved the desired result. With mounting allegations of human rights violations in the province, the government has now declared itself ready to investigate recent findings of the Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace in Zimbabwe.

    Source: BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION AND AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING COMMISSION

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAOGJVTHEW5Y6IX6JT8390LBNN
    Media URN:
    VLVAAOGJVTHEW5Y6IX6JT8390LBNN
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/04/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:59:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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