• Short Summary

    Canadian authorities believe debris from a Soviet nuclear-powered satellite - which fell from space last Tuesday (24 January) - may have hit the ground in Northern Canada after all.

  • Description

    1.
    GV: Looking over Canadian landscape from inside American aircraft searching for satellite. (2 SHOTS)
    0.08

    2.
    MV: Scientists using computer equipment in plane. (2 SHOTS)
    0.14

    3.
    GV: Canadian countryside from plane.
    0.19

    4.
    GV: Search leader's press conference.
    0.27

    5.
    GV: Col. David Garland Base Commander, speaking to press.
    0.40

    6.
    MV: Newsman.
    0.45

    7.
    SV: Mr. Mahlon Gates, U.S. Dept. of Energy speaking to press.
    0.54

    8.
    CU: Dr. William Nelson, U.S. Scientist, speaking.
    1.05

    9.
    EXT GV: Baker Lake, Northwest Territories. (2 SHOTS)
    1.15

    10.
    GV: Car drives out to helicopter.
    1.23

    11.
    GV: Baker Lake homes.
    1.26

    12.
    SV: Town manager David Simailuk speaking.
    1.47

    13.
    GV PAN: Children playing in snow outside school.
    1.52

    14.
    INT MV: Baker Lake inhabitants questioning Captain John Lynd, Survey Team. (2 SHOTS)
    1.57

    15.
    MV PAN: Capt. John Lynd answering questions.
    2.13

    16.
    EXT GV: Child walking towards setting sun at Baker Lake.
    2.22


    TRANSCRIPT: NEAL: "The search teams are still out, flying over the permafrost of Canada's Northwest Territories and looking for traces of the Russian satellite. And today the scientists are saying that contrary to yesterday's report from Canada's Minister of Defence, they have located two radioactive hotspots that could have been created by the satellite. Yesterday's contradictory announcement was discussed by colonel David Garland, Commander of the base from which the search aircraft are flying."



    SEQ. 5: COLONEL GARLAND: "Under the pressure of the workload of the day and that sort of thing I think that on both the operational side and the scientific analysis side, certain conclusions were reached prematurely yesterday."



    NEAL: "Because of their later findings, the scientists have renewed optimism."



    SEQ. 7: MR. MAHLON GATES: "I think my confidence looks something like a sine curve. It was high, it went down temporarily and I think it's back up again."



    SEQ. 8: DR. WILLIAM NELSON: "I'd say where we stand today is that we have two areas that are geographically quite separate from each other that have - from which we have obtained data that appears to be non-natural in origin."



    MATTE: "Baker Lake is an isolated hamlet of about 1,000 people, most of them (INDISTINCT), which like most northern communities relies on airplanes for its supplies most of the year. There were wild rumours, the most alarming being that Baker Lake would be evacuated. There never was such a plan. Many of the people just didn't understand what was going on."



    SEQ. 12: DAVID SIMAILUK: "Well, from what I can gather the major concern right now is just a lot of misunderstanding. People are not sure at all as to what us going on. They have heard generally that something has fallen out of the sky - something that belongs to the Russians, but exactly what it is and what it means, they are not sure at all."



    MATTE: "A member of the investigative team visited a school to answer questions from the youngsters and he also went to the adult education centre to answer questions from the adults."



    RESIDENT: "Will the Russians come here and help cleaning up, or something like...?"



    SEQ. 15: CAPTAIN JOHN LYND: "Well as I say, I don't know. At the moment, no. We're - the Canadians will do the cleaning up."'



    MATTE: "The people of Baker Lake will not seem forget the mystery of the Soviet spy satellite. Terry Matte CBC News at Baker Lake in the Northwest Territories."




    Initials JS/2205


    TELERECORDING
    REPORTER: ROY NEAL (NBC) AND TERRY MATE (CBC)

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Canadian authorities believe debris from a Soviet nuclear-powered satellite - which fell from space last Tuesday (24 January) - may have hit the ground in Northern Canada after all.

    Canadian Defence Chief Robert Falls said on Friday that he believed the spacecraft had burned out in the atmosphere and he dismissed a report of high radiation, saying it was due to faulty detection equipment.

    But a Canadian defence spokesman has now said Admiral Falls' dismissal of the radiation report may have been premature. The spokesman announced on Saturday night that a seismic signal was recorded after the satellite, Cosmos 954, re-entered the atmosphere. He said this indicated that something may have hit the ground and searchers now had a higher degree of confidence that something could be there. Here are reports from the National Broadcasting Company Incorporated, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAMBODNTM2QPIU1GM9VNE8SLG7
    Media URN:
    VLVAAMBODNTM2QPIU1GM9VNE8SLG7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/01/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:02:23:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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