• Short Summary

    Scientists from 70 countries have just begun a hundred-day international experiment to improve long-range weather forecasting.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Canadian weather ship in Dakar harbour
    0.05

    2.
    CU United Nations and Senegalese flags
    0.08

    3.
    LV & CU Weather dome on Canadian ship PAN DOWN ship
    0.18

    4.
    GV PAN FROM Weather balloon TO American weather ships in harbour
    0.27

    5.
    GV French ships
    0.30

    6.
    GV PAN Weather balloon TO NOAA boat
    0.37

    7.
    SV INT PAN FROM Flags of participating countries TO telex machines
    0.42

    8.
    SV Official explains location chart to African visitors
    0.53

    9.
    SV PAN Operators at telex and radio equipment
    1.01

    10.
    SCU Operator sending morse codo
    1.02

    11.
    CU Visitors in operations room
    1.09

    12.
    CU Diagram
    1.14

    13.
    CU Ticker tape messages
    1.18

    14.
    CU Official shows photograph and explains to visitors
    1.26

    15.
    SV PAN Soviet aircraft on tarmac
    1.31

    16.
    CU PAN ALONG Soviet aircraft TO sightseers.
    1.38

    17.
    CU PAN US aircraft with sightseers going aboard
    1.42

    18.
    GV Airport building
    1.49

    19.
    GV Weather telescope
    1.54



    Initials BB/2209 A/AW/BB/2236



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Scientists from 70 countries have just begun a hundred-day international experiment to improve long-range weather forecasting.

    The experiment is being carried out in the Atlantic tropics. The operations control centre is at Dakar airport in the West African country of Senegal.

    Forty ships -- the largest international fleet ever assembled for peaceful purposes -- are taking part in the experiment. The United States and the Soviet Union have donated satellites and other equipment. Thirteen instrumented research aircraft will also send back detailed weather observations.

    It was decided to hold the experiment in the tropics because that is where the "heat engine" that drives the world's weather is found.

    Most of the sun's heat is stored at the top of the tropical oceans. This heat gets into the atmosphere when vertical air currents transform the evaporating water into clouds -- but the scientists want to understand the process more exactly.

    The experiment is only part of an international scientific effort known as GARP -- the Global Atmospheric Research Programme. The world's meteorologists are worried about the recent growth of the ice bolt, the continuing drought in Africa and the failure of the Soviet harvest.

    Canadian Kenneth Hare, a former President of the Royal Meteorological Society, has said "I don't believe the world's present population is sustainable if there are more than three years like 1972 in a row."
    SYNOPSIS: Until early September nearly a thousand satellite ground-receiving stations will be observing weather phenomena from five thousand feet under the sea to the top of the atmosphere -- with the help of thirteen instrumented aircraft. The whole project will cost about a hundred million dollars.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAK3RK5V4KFOCPVS9BYY3J43GE
    Media URN:
    VLVAAK3RK5V4KFOCPVS9BYY3J43GE
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    27/06/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    MP4
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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