• Short Summary

    The largest civil defence exercise in years took place in Jerusalem on wednesday (26 November) in the Ramot quarter.

  • Description

    The largest civil defence exercise in years took place in Jerusalem on wednesday (26 November) in the Ramot quarter.

    Israeli Defence Minister Shimon Press joined Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy Kollek and General Yona Efrat of Central Command to observe the exercise.

    With sirens blaring in the background, several major fires were attacked by the civil defence firefighting crews. Other groups started evacuating "victims" by chutes and stretchers from the top of building.

    In the last few years, civil defence in Israel has turned away from a homeguard type of activity to a proper arm of the defence forces.

    The aim of the exercise was to show the authorities' ability to protect the civilian population in time of war.

    During the 1967 six-day war, a spokesman of haga (as civil defence is known) said no wounded person in Jerusalem lay longer than five minutes before help arrived. No fire spread to large dimension, he said, and no-one was buried under debris for any length of time.

    In the course of the exercise, a devise was demonstrated which can indicate whether any person is buried under a pile of rubble. It is a modern listing device which could save hours of rescue work in the event of a crisis.

    The increased emphasis on civil defence coincides with a tightening of security in the city. This followed a bomb blast in early November which killed six Israelis and injured 42 others. It was believed to have been planted by Arab guerrillas.

    SYNOPSIS: The Ramot quarter in Jerusalem where on Wednesday the biggest civil defence exercise in years took place. It was a show of strength to demonstrate the authorities' ability to protect the civilian population in the event of war. The emphasis was on firefighting and rescue work.

    Several major fires were attacked by the civil defence firefighting crews. In the last few years, civil defence, or haga as it is known in Jerusalem has turned away from a homeguard type of activity to proper arm of the defence forces.

    Israeli defence Minister Shilom Press and General Yona Erfat of Central Command joined Jerusalem's Mayor Teddy Kollek to observe the exercise.

    Jerusalem prides itself on its civil defence record. It claims that during the 1967 six-day war, no wounded person lay longer than five minutes before help arrived. No fire spread to large dimensions and no-one was buried under debris for any length of time.

    Various methods of rescuing people from high building---including a covered chute---were demonstrated.Another new devise can indicate to rescue workers whether anybody is buried beneath rubble. It is a listening devise which may save many hours of searching in the event of a crisis.

    The increased emphasis on civil defence in Jerusalem coincides with tightened security in the city following several incidents. The latest serious incident was a bomb blast in early November which killed six Israelis and injured 42 others. It was believed the bomb was planted by Arab guerrillas.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAITAK1X7TL7JWX2UAW6TN5BL4
    Media URN:
    VLVAAITAK1X7TL7JWX2UAW6TN5BL4
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/11/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:56:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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