• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: President Leonid Brezhnev said on Monday (23 November) the Soviet Union would be prepared to negotiate a reduction "not of dozens, but hundreds" of nuclear weapons at the forthcoming Geneva talks with the United States.

  • Description

    1.
    CU Cruise missile being launched and in flight. (3 SHOTS)
    0.14

    2.
    GV Pershing II rocket launched.
    0.18

    3.
    GV Simulated nuclear explosion and neutron bomb diagram. (3 SHOTS)
    0.32

    4.
    West Germany, 1981: SV Troops leaving aircraft - Air Force base entrance and troops marching post. (4 SHOTS)
    0.45

    5.
    Washington, May 1981: SV PULL BACK TO Schmidt and Reagan on dais taking salute on white House lawn anti-nuclear demonstrators outside - SV Schmidt talking to Reagan. (3 SHOTS)
    1.05

    6.
    Hamburg, June 1981: SCU Hans Apel speaking.
    1.14

    7.
    SV Demonstrators chanting.
    1.17

    8.
    GV Eggs being thrown at rostrum and officials emerging with riot shields. (2 SHOTS)
    1.23

    9.
    GV Crowd.
    1.25

    10.
    SCU Hans Apel continues speaking.
    1.35

    11.
    Frankfurt, October 1981: OU General Bastion speaking in English.
    2.06

    12.
    Bonn, September 1981: GVs Demonstrators with banners. (3 SHOTS)
    2.25

    13.
    GV PAN Large crowd at rally.
    2.34

    14.
    LV Haig walking down steps of plane.
    2.39

    15.
    GV Big anti-Saig visit demonstration in West Berlin. (2 SHOTS)
    2.47

    16.
    SV Riot police chasing demonstrators, removing car form debris burning in street and CU "War Haig Go Home". (4 SHOTS)
    2.58

    17.
    Bad Kreuznach, West Germany, November 1981: CU ZOOM OUT Console panel and operator on phone - CU man speaking through microphones.
    3.08

    18.
    GV Leader charting movements on map CU ZOOM OUT illuminated map. (2 SHOTS)
    3.16

    19.
    sv Banks of teleprinters & PAN AROUND operations room.
    3.25

    20.
    SV Sign "Dernau" - GVs Government bunkers on hillside in Eifel Mountains. (4 SHOTS)
    3.40

    21.
    Bonn, 23 November 1981: SV President Brezhnev and Schmidt walking past guard of honour.
    3.59


    SPEECH (TRANSCRIPT)



    BASTION:"...If a general is convinced that the new nuclear arms race cause of NATO will not improve our security but will make a nuclear war in Europe, espeacially a nuclear was in Europe more probable, he has the duty to oppose against this nonsence. And therefore I am fighting side by side with millions of people in our countries against more nuclear weapons in Europe and for nuclear free zone in our continent."





    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: President Leonid Brezhnev said on Monday (23 November) the Soviet Union would be prepared to negotiate a reduction "not of dozens, but hundreds" of nuclear weapons at the forthcoming Geneva talks with the United States. He made this offer during a speech in Bonn after his first day of talks with Chancellor Helmut Schmidt and other West German leaders. During Monday's negotiations, Mr. Brezhnev's spokesman said the Soviet Union would be going to Geneva in a "positive" spirit and would re-examine President Reagan's arms control proposals for Europe. But Herr Schmidt firmly warned Mr. Brezhnev that if there were no agreement in the Geneva nuclear weapons talks by Autum 1983, West Germany would go ahead with the deployment of U.S. Pershing 2 and Cruise missiles."
    SYNOPSIS: The political uproar in West Germany over the deployment of these new American missiles and the production of neutron weapons could force Helmut Schmidt into early retirement. The Chancellor's main problem is the growing left-wing opposition in his party to nuclear arms, including the deadly neutron warhead.

    Unlike other nuclear weapons, the neutron warhead wouldn't detonate with a huge blast. It produces a smaller explosion, accompanied by heavy radiation, which would kill human being in the path and leave buildings standing. Supporters of the weapon say it would help NATO forces overcome a superior number of Soviet troops and tanks.

    During Chancellor Schmidt's visit to Washington last May, President Reagan assured him the United States would modernise the medium-range weapons stationed in Europe. At the same time he said American would call for negotiations to limit those very weapons. At home, West German opposition to the missile plan was increasingly bitter.

    It made itself felt in June when West Germany's Defence Minister Hans Apel was supporting NATO plans to install the new Pershing and Cruise missiles. Eggs were thrown at him by angry members of the nation's fast-growing Peace Movement.

    In a move unprecedented in the nation's history, the governing Social Democrats opened a formal debate with the Peace Movement. West German General Gerd bastion left the army to join this alliance.

    Anti-nuclear demonstrations throughout Europe have grown to mammoth proportions in recent months. A quarter of a million people, mainly young pacifists and ecologists came to Bonn in September to demand a nuclear-free Europe. It highlighted public opposition to the stance taken by Chancellor Schmidt in championing NATO's 1979 decision to deploy the new weapons by 1983.

    American Secretary of State Alexander Haig ran into a more violent demonstration when he arrived in West Berlin three days later. He said he was there to underline America's unshakable determination to defend West Berlin. The protesters replied they wouldn't allow themselves to be "protected to death".

    West Germany would be in the front line in the event of conventional or any form of nuclear attack. This secret bunker near Bad Kreuznach controls civil defence for Rhineland Palatinate and Snarland. The command post keeps local centres informed during simulated air attacks.

    The government supports the building of private nuclear shelters with subsidies and about six per cent of the population have private bunkers in the houses.

    These nuclear bomb-proof bunkers at Dernau are not for public viewing. They're a refuge for ministers and other high-ranking officials who can get there before an expected attack and form an emergency government.

    President Brezhnev's talks with Herr Schmidt came soon after West Germany's opposition Christian Democrats pledged unreserved support for the NATO missile programme in Europe. But the ruling Social Democrats are divided in their views and Chancellor Schmidt threatens to resign if his party withdraws its support for NATO's nuclear plans.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAAGUOY5ZY0PCSHLGF4O8L79HN
    Media URN:
    VLVAAAGUOY5ZY0PCSHLGF4O8L79HN
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    24/11/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:04:01:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment