• Short Summary

    United States President Gerald Ford had a second round of talks with Chinese leaders in Peking on Wednesday (3 December).

  • Description

    United States President Gerald Ford had a second round of talks with Chinese leaders in Peking on Wednesday (3 December). The President and Mrs. Ford also managed to tour part of the city including a museum.

    Throughout most of the discussions during President Ford's visit, his host has been Vice Premier Teng Hsiao-Ping who started Wednesday's round of talks by recalling Mr. Ford's meeting with Chairman Mao Tse-Tung the previous day.

    The talks on Wednesday centred on international issues and lasted almost seven hours. However, there was no official comment on how the discussions were going.

    With President Ford was his Secretary of State, Dr. Henry Kissinger. Dr. Kissinger refused to be drawn on whether the two sides had touched on disagreements over U.S. detente with the Soviet Union -- a major issue with the Chinese leaders.

    Ten representatives from each side sat down on either side of a velvet covered table with cups of Jasmine tea, folded towels and note pads.

    Later, President Ford joined his wife Betty for a tour of the Peking Exhibition Hall and the Chinese Museum. The couple talked casually with several Chinese officials.

    SYNOPSIS: Peking with United States President Ford and Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger meeting Chinese Vice Premier Teng for the second round of talks during the President's visit to China.

    The talks opened with Mr. Teng recalling the President's meeting with Chairman Mao Tse-Tung the previous day.

    The latest discussions centred on international issues and lasted almost seven hours. However, there was no comment on how the talks were going.

    Meanwhile, Mrs. Ford was touring the Peking Exhibition Hall where she was later joined by the President. Both American and Chinese officials would not be drawn on the content of the talks.

    However, a major issue with the Chinese is the U.S. policy of detente with the Soviet Union. They oppose the policy and have warned that the Soviet Union is not to be trusted.

    The Chinese have said that nations should be preparing to meet a threat from the Soviet Union and not try to reach an understanding with Moscow.

    The apparent difference in view between the U.S. and Chinese delegations wasn't noticeable as the Presidential party was shown the sights of the Forbidden City.

    Clearly the President was in a jovial mood although his press secretary, Mr. Ron Nessen has said that Mr. Ford has made it quite clear that there will be no change in the detente policy with the Soviet Union.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAAA61V1LULDVXWF4PGPR965UZ1
    Media URN:
    VLVAAA61V1LULDVXWF4PGPR965UZ1
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/12/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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