• Short Summary

    Three gunmen who have held out for four days on a plane they hijacked in the southern Philippines agreed on Sunday (11 April) to release all but two of their 12 hostages in return for a new jetliner to fly them out of Bangkok.

  • Description

    Three gunmen who have held out for four days on a plane they hijacked in the southern Philippines agreed on Sunday (11 April) to release all but two of their 12 hostages in return for a new jetliner to fly them out of Bangkok.
    Senior officials of the Thai and philippines governments said the plane, a DC-8, was on its way from Manila with authorization from President Ferdinand Marcos. It will refuel in Bangkok on Sunday night, take on the hijackers and their two remaining Filipino hostages and leave immediately for Calcutta.
    The hijackers earlier threatened to blow up the short-haul BAC-111 jet which they commandeered last Wednesday and in which they had been stranded in Bangkok for more than 48 hours because of Burmese Government refusal to allow the hijackers to fly over Burma and the need for spare parts to repair the jet.
    In Manila, 72 passengers held for 30 hours were released unharmed on Thursday (8 April) in exchange for a three-man internationally-rated crew and an airline vice-president, Mr. Rafael Igoa, who reportedly carried 300,000 dollars US ransom money on board. The hijackers said they were members of a Moslem secessionist group.
    SYNOPSIS: Bangkok International airport, and three gunmen who have held out for four days on a plane they hijacked in the southern Philippines agreed on Sunday to release all but two of their 12 hostages in return for a new jetliner to fly them out of Bangkok.
    The hijackers earlier threatened to blow up the BAC-111 jet they hijacked on Wednesday.
    In Manila, the gunmen had held the plane for 30 hours, demanding an internationally-rated crew to fly them out of the country.
    Airline officials agreed to provide the crew for the plane. A vice-president, Mr. Rafael Igoa, also boarded the plane, carrying a bag believed to carry three hundred thousand dollars demanded by the gunmen.
    The gunmen then released 72 of the hostages unharmed. The hijackers claim they are members of a Moslem secessionist group.
    They originally wanted to be flown to Libya, but the Libyan government refused to allow them to land. They then decided on Egypt, but again met with refusal to land.
    The BAC-111 eventually left Manila for Bangkok airport, where it was delayed by mechanical trouble and also by Burmese government refusal to allow the hijacked plane to fly over Burma.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAA92US207UI1Q7EKCN26Y28PPF
    Media URN:
    VLVAA92US207UI1Q7EKCN26Y28PPF
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    11/04/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:36:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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