• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The cease-fire arranged on Monday (2 February) in the border clash between Ecuador and Peru appears to be holding Military observers from the four nations which arranged the cease-fire - Argentina, Brazil, Chile and the United States - have visited the border area from each side, and found no sign of any more fighting.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Crowd outside Presidential Palace in Lima
    0.11

    2.
    GV President Belaunde standing at top of steps, walks forward, salutes
    0.30

    3.
    GV Band playing in courtyard, GV President Belaunde walks through courtyard, salutes flag
    0.48

    4.
    GV TILT DOWN Palace facade to courtyard SV crowd chanting outside railings (2 shots)
    1.07

    5.
    GV Officials on steps look on at ceremony
    1.15

    6.
    GV TILT DOWN from flag to guard in courtyard
    1.20

    7.
    SV PAN from sound recordist to crowd chanting "Peru"
    1.36

    8.
    GV Troops march past President Belaunde (2 shots)
    2.00




    Initials PM





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The cease-fire arranged on Monday (2 February) in the border clash between Ecuador and Peru appears to be holding Military observers from the four nations which arranged the cease-fire - Argentina, Brazil, Chile and the United States - have visited the border area from each side, and found no sign of any more fighting. Ecuador has said it had nine soldier missing; Peru says its casualties were one killed and three wounded.

    SYNOPSIS: The Peruvians take the view that Ecuador started the fighting by occupying three outposts on Peruvian territory; and thousands of them turned out on Sunday (1 February) to welcome their President, Fernando Belaunde Terry, back from a visit to the frontier region. He ordered a cease-fire as soon as the Peruvians had re-occupied the three posts; and brought back with him to Lima the three wounded soldiers and a Peruvian flag.

    The flag was one which the Ecuadorian troops were said to have captured when they re-occupied the position. President Belaunde said its return symbolised Peru's restored sovereignty over its territory.

    The ceremony of honouring the flag, which took place before the cease-fire had been arranged, was treated by the people in Lima as an occasion for a display of patriotic fervour.

    The Ecuadorian government gives a completely different account of the whole incident. It says that Peru was the aggressor, and that the fighting took place inside Ecuador. The frontier, fixed by treaty in 1941, was left unmarked for a 50-mile (80 kilometre) stretch along the peaks of he Condor mountains, where the latest fighting took place.

    Feelings are still running high, despite the cease-fire. Ecuador has said it has not renounced its claims over the disputed border And its President, Senor Jaime Roldos, has said he would not hold direct talks with President Belaunde, whom he considered had not acted in good faith.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAA8GGZMZPE12V6V9721S7SOHM4
    Media URN:
    VLVAA8GGZMZPE12V6V9721S7SOHM4
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    04/02/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:00:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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