• Short Summary

    Black leaders of Southern African countries have called for international help to combat what they describe as implacable hostility from South Africa.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Cimeira Summit sign (2 shots)
    0.06

    2.
    GVs People demonstrating, holding anti-apartheid banner
    0.11

    3.
    CU PULL BACK Photograph of Mozambique leader Machel TO People in crowd singing (3 shots)
    0.32

    4.
    SV PAN AND GV Heads of Stated seated at news conference (2 shots)
    1.09

    5.
    SV SADCC chairman Masire, of Botswana, speaking with other leaders listening (SOT) (3 shots)
    2.05

    6.
    SV PAN Masire answering questions (2 shots) (SOT)
    2.30


    TRANSCRIPT (SEQUENCES FIVE AND SIX):



    MASIRE: "If it were not a threat we would not have mentioned it as a threat and it's a very serious threat as it threatens our very existence, therefore I thought everybody would realise just how serious it is because it is a matter of life and death. As you all know we are primarily concerned with infrastructure and therefore if South Africa has I don't think it is anything that any of us here would very much mind."



    QUESTION: (INDISTINCT)



    MASIRE: "Because it is really a spurious question. It has nothing to do with Namibian independence, it is (indistinct) been pulled in for a live measure."





    Initials MAW/BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Black leaders of Southern African countries have called for international help to combat what they describe as implacable hostility from South Africa. At the end of the one-day Southern African Development Co-ordination Conference (SADCC), held in Maputo, the leaders issued a communique saying the region was fighting for survival in an undeclared war with South Africa. The SADCC comprises Mozambique, Angola, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Lesotho, Swaziland, Tanzania and Botswana. Malawi's leader, Dr Hastings Banda, was absent from this year's summit. Under the chairmanship of Botswana President, Quett Masire, the eight heads of state accused the white-ruled South African republic of waging a covert war to keep them economically dependent, to show that black rule was not working end to set up a protective barrier around its borders while crushing internal black dissent. At a news conference President masire stressed that members saw the threat from South Africa as a matter of life and death, fearing their cries for international help were increasingly in vain. In its three years of existence, the SADCC has attracted considerable investment funds from industrialised nations. But they say they've had little response to appeals for the same investors to bring a moderating influence to bear on South Africa. The SADCC's communique said that some nations who sought to improve their relations with South Africa were at the same time supplying South Africa with capital, technology, management skills and weapons with which Pretoria could continue its policy of regional destabilisation. The communique said it was irrational for these countries to invest in regional infrastructure only to see the resources they helped to provide in South Africa destroyed and wasted by South African sabotage. President Masire urged the international community to transfer funds it received from the republic to SADCC countries "in the name of peace" and as an investment in the future. The SADCC was established in 1980 to reduce regional dependence on South Africa.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAA6K6BEQFHDEU2E32ZXGJYM1AQ
    Media URN:
    VLVAA6K6BEQFHDEU2E32ZXGJYM1AQ
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/07/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:31:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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