• Short Summary

    The two Soviet cosmonauts, Alexei Leonov and Valery Kubasov, landed in the plains of Central Asia on Monday (21 July) after their historic mission in the Soyuz space craft to link-up in space with the United States spacecraft, Apollo.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Scyuz coming down on parachute. (3 shots)
    0.14

    2.
    SV Soyuz capsule landing in huge crowd of dust blown up by retro-rockets. (3 shots)
    0.34

    3.
    AERIAL TO GOUND VIEW OF People running towards capsule on ground.
    0.38

    4.
    SV AND CU Engineers working on capsule and removing hatch. (3 shots)
    0.51

    5.
    SV Kubasov comes out of capsule and is greeted by Russian officials.
    0.58

    6.
    TV AND SV Leonov also emerging from capsule and being greeted. (2 shots)
    1.14

    7.
    AERIAL VIEW Recovery helicopters on ground.
    1.18

    8.
    SV Cosmonauts and officials leaving capsule.
    1.26

    9.
    SCU Bell-shaped descent vehicle of Soyuz.
    1.38

    10.
    TV Cosmonauts surrounded by officials and exports.
    1.49


    TRANSCRIPT: WILSON: "The first shots of Soyuz came through as she was about six thousand feet up, sailing along under the one huge parachute. Below are the virgin lands of Kazakahtan and the circling recovery helicopters. All the cameras were aboard helicopters. And here's their landing. (RUSSIAN VOICES) That huge cloud of dust was not caused by a heavy landing. It was caused by retro-rockets which the Russians fire eight feet from the ground to provide a soft touch-down. (RUSSIAN VOICES) Millions of Soviet viewers saw the lunch-time TV programme, showing a Russian recovery operation for the very first time. The landing was six miles from the planned spot because of the high winds - it was also hot on the Steppes. Soon they had the hatches open and after a flight of two-and-a-half million miles, Kubasov came out to applause from Moscow Mission Control. Within a couple of minutes Leonov was out too - he's on the right. He admitted needing a little while to get his land legs. He was tired and feeling the effects of the return into gravity.



    There were greetings and bear hugs and official congratulations all round. The size of the recovery operations, with eight huge helicopters, was emphasised by the Russian commentary, and there was also a doctor and a medical unit to give a first-hand check to the air cosmonauts. The bell-shaped descent vehicle is the central portion os Soyuz. The orbital module we've seen during flight, and the heat shield, are jettisoned, so there are none of the burn marks we see on Apollo craft. And of course, there had to be a little final speech by the Soyuz commander, Leonov."




    Initials VS 24.45 VS 24.30


    TELERECORDING
    VISNEWS APOLOGISES FOR THE POOR PICTURE QUALITY OF THIS TELERECORDING
    This film is serviced with a sound commentary by the B.B.C.'s Science Correspondent, David Wilson, a transcription of which is provided on page two.
    REPORTER: DAVID WILSON

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The two Soviet cosmonauts, Alexei Leonov and Valery Kubasov, landed in the plains of Central Asia on Monday (21 July) after their historic mission in the Soyuz space craft to link-up in space with the United States spacecraft, Apollo. Soyuz swung down on it's single parachute near the small town of Arkalyk, some 500 kilometres (300 miles) north east of the Baikonur launch site - so bringing to an end the first international manned venture in space.

    The two cosmonauts reported that they were "feeling fine" to the helicopter-borne rescue crews as they descended to earth. Their landing was right on schedule, and for the first time Soviet Television cameras were there to give millions of people round the World live pictures of the descending space ship.

    Leonov and Kubaeov had been in space for six days, and during two of those days, their craft had been linked with the three-man Apollo, in the first attempt by the two major powers to team their costly space programmes.

    All the television cameras assigned to cover the touchdown were carried on helicopters, and the first sight they caught of the descending Soyuz was as it broke through the cloudy sky about six minutes before the landing was scheduled. In spite of the ward weather, the wind was strong enough to blow the craft 10 kilometres (6 miles) off what would have been a pinpoint touchdown.

    About eight feet from the ground, retro-rockets on Soyuz fired at the base of the capsule, slowing it to a virtual halt. Within minutes, dozens of helicopters, trucks and vans were at the scent, and technicians unscrewed the exit hatch to retrieve the two men.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9XMAZ420NPWSBA9SU3QHROD38
    Media URN:
    VLVA9XMAZ420NPWSBA9SU3QHROD38
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/07/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:49:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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