• Short Summary

    Talks between Rhodesia's white minority government and black nationalists on the future of the country broke down in Salisbury on Friday (19 March).

  • Description

    Talks between Rhodesia's white minority government and black nationalists on the future of the country broke down in Salisbury on Friday (19 March).

    Nationalist leader, Joshua Nkomo, said Prime Minister Ian Smith refused to accept immediate rule by the six million blacks, who outnumber the whites by 20 to one.

    "We are trying to remove the causes of war" he said. "These people have refused to remove the causes of war. It is obvious - they have said they are prepared for war. They have done it, not us".

    Mr. Smith, whose government has come under increasing pressure to settle with the nationalists since the end of Portuguese colonial rule in Angola and neighbouring Mozambique, said the nationalists had rejected far-reaching proposals for power-sharing.

    And he said that the British Government should now "actively participate" in resolving the constitutional issue in Rhodesia, which unilaterally declared its independence from Britain in 1965.

    A British Foreign Office spokesman said in London on Friday - "Our position is that there is no question of the British government becoming involved in he talks until it is clear that Mr. Smith accepts that there must be an early transition to majority rule".

    SYNOPSIS: In Rhodesia Prime Minister Ian Smith was at Government House in Salisbury on Friday for constitutional talks with black nationalists on the country's future. The nationalist representatives were lead by Mr. Joshua Nkomo, who heads the internal wing of the African National Council. Later that day it was announced that the talks had been broken off.

    A statement issued in Salisbury after the 13th meeting between black and white negotiators sine December, said that the participants had reached an impasse and were breaking off the talks. Afterwards Mr. Nkomo joined in some light relief from the business of politics but the fact remains that the outlook is bleak for Rhodesia now. Mr. Smith said the nationalists had rejected proposals for power-sharing, but Mr. Nkomo said that the white minority had refused to remove the causes of war.

    Mr. Nkomo explained his view of the future for Rhodesia to newsmen after the talks.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9WGYCT6200JCVG9FT66PMVIIC
    Media URN:
    VLVA9WGYCT6200JCVG9FT66PMVIIC
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/03/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:21:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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