• Short Summary

    The village of Fernhill in Surrey (UK), has no church, no pub, no shops, and if most of its residents have their way, it won't be long before it has no people either.

  • Description

    1.
    MV Man riding horse down road
    0.06

    2.
    SV child riding horse with little girl walking alongside
    0.13

    3.
    SV Ducks in pond
    0.19

    4.
    GV Village Pan to aircraft flying overhead
    0.22

    5.
    SV Lorry along village road
    0.35

    6.
    LV Aircraft flying past gardenof empty house
    0.42

    7.
    SV Moteorway construction sign
    0.43

    8.
    LV aircraft everhead
    0.46

    9.
    GV Trucks on road
    0.50

    10.
    GV Gatwick airport building
    0.51

    11.
    CU Noise measuring instrument
    0.53

    12.
    SCU Cyril Arrondelle interview (3 SHOTS)
    1.31

    13.
    SV Bob Jeal being interviewed in his glasshouse (2 shots)
    1.44

    14.
    LV & SV Mrs. Doris Tlsed being interviewed in garden (3 shots)
    2.24


    MR. CYRIL ARRONDELLE: We've been here for over thirteen years new and Gatwick airport was supposed to be a white elephant when we first arrived and we did inquire about it. They Surrey County Council said that it wasn't going to be extended and I really think that they believed that it would not and they were ever-ruled by the Government.



    REPORTER: See what you want to do new is to rezone the area and turn it into an industrial let?



    MR. C. ARRONDELLE: Yes, well, warehouses, offices, light industry.



    REPORTER: Isn't it going to be something of a blot on the Surrey community?



    MR. C. ARRONDELLE: Well not really. You see there's only a hundred acres here and what can you call this now?



    REPORTER: What have you get left new Mr. Joal?



    MR. BOB JEAL: One plant out of three. We've lost two plants out of three already (the interview is drowned out completely by a passing jet...8 seconds of 100% inaudible high level noise).



    MRS. DORIS TILSED: Well I heard a most peculiar noise because it was quite a different type from the ordinary engine noise that gives over. It hit that tree there and there was a terrific crash in all the branches etcetera, and it just went over the house with very few feet to spare and hit the tree at the other and of the garden.



    REPORTER: What did you think at that moment?



    MRS. D. TILSED: Well I didn't know what I thought, but I immediately know that it was a plane coming down. I thought it was in flames actually as I looked out of the window until I saw that, or, oil at the back.



    REPORTER: What is it like living so close to a disaster?



    MRS. D. TILSED: Well for quite twelve months, I think we were petrified. We have certainly got more used to it new.




    Initials AE/2.44AE/3.36


    WARREN MCSTOKER

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The village of Fernhill in Surrey (UK), has no church, no pub, no shops, and if most of its residents have their way, it won't be long before it has no people either.

    It's just too noisy to live there any more, they say.

    Fornhill is nice enough. It's only got about thirty houses, all neatly placed in a lush green belt with ponds, mushrooms, trees and even a few orchids. But it's only about half a mile (.8KM) from Gatwick Airport and right below the flight path of hundreds of jets every day.

    The jets fly as low as 150 feet (45 metres) above the feeftops as they take off and leave Gatwick, which has become London's second busiest jetport.

    Some of the residents have tried having their windows double-glazed. They've had extra insulation stuffed into their ceilings. Others have just tried to "got accustomed to it all".

    But it's not working. A couple of the residents say the noise and vibration of the jets has caused glass windows to break. It's been blamed for family arguments. Telephone calls are often a waste of time. Conversations with neighbours are just about impossible, and one flower gardener blames the deluge of decibels for making his prize blooms wilt.

    What was left of the rural bliss of Fornhill was finally eaten away by another problem, on the ground. The newly finished M23 link motorway, complete with its thundering semi-trailers, goes right down one side of the village.

    Fornhill has a sad record of the airline business, tee. Four years ago, a Boeing 727 crashed onto the village, killing 48 passengers and two villagers.

    So the villagers have thrown in the towel. They've collectively decided to put their village up for sale. They're trying to got Government permission to sell the village as an industrial site. They want GBP 4-million (about $10-Million US) and despite the noise, they say the village would be ideal for light industry.

    On Wednesday (15 August), some of the villagers explained that they wanted to cut their losses and find somewhere quiet to live.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9MN66DNRWL9TT7Z8VKEGGN7IO
    Media URN:
    VLVA9MN66DNRWL9TT7Z8VKEGGN7IO
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/08/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:24:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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