• Short Summary

    The soaring gold prices of the past few months have brought a big economic boom to South Africa, but the resulting government policies are producing strong reactions from the blacks and the more liberal whites.

  • Description

    1.
    GTV AND TS: Johannesburg skyline and high-rise development. (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    SV PAN: High rises
    0.22

    3.
    GV: People walking in streets
    0.24

    4.
    SV ZOOM INTO CU: Gold and Silversmith's shop
    0.29

    5.
    SV ZOOM INTO CU: Man weighing gold rings.
    0.35

    6.
    SV: Goldsmith melting gold TILT DOWN to gold being melted down and poured into ingots.
    0.53

    7.
    GV PAN INTERIOR: Hypermarket with shoppers
    1.05

    8.
    SV: Woman checker at till PULL BACK to shoppers with trolleys
    1.14

    9.
    SV PAN FROM: Cashier TO girls packing groceries
    1.20

    10.
    SV TILT DOWN: Hi-Fi shop selling electronic equipment
    1.31

    11.
    GV PAN FROM: People walking in streets TO Alfa Romso car showroom.
    1.38

    12.
    SV TILT DOWN: BMW building TO double decker busses
    1.44

    13.
    SV PAN FROM: Jaguar car TO executive cars showroom
    1.50

    14.
    GV: Shoppers in street
    1.55

    15.
    GV INTERIOR: Bank
    2.00

    16.
    CU AND SV: Bank teller counting out money. (2 shots)
    2.08

    17.
    SV PAN: Bank with customer queues
    2.16

    18.
    GV: British Airways plane taxing on runway
    2.22

    19.
    GV: People with luggage disembarking
    2.29

    20.
    SV PULL OUT TO GV INTERIOR: Of airport with people wheeling luggage in carts.
    2.37

    21.
    GV PULL OUT TO LV: Johannesburg
    2.48




    Initials RH/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The soaring gold prices of the past few months have brought a big economic boom to South Africa, but the resulting government policies are producing strong reactions from the blacks and the more liberal whites. Immigration laws have been relaxed and the government has offered to pay eighty percent of the travel cost of skilled workers in an effort to woo them to the country.

    SYNOPSIS: The Johannesburg skyline is rich with modern high-rises buildings and if the prediction of renewed economic progress proves true, they could mushroom at an even greater rate. But according to South Africa's Sunday Times, the boom is not helping the blacks as jobs are mostly going to new white immigrants.

    The boom is a result of the soaring price of gold. South Africa is the world's biggest gold producer, with exports running to billions of dollars a year. But while residents in other cities of the world are cashing in on the high prices by selling their jewellery, the prices in South Africa for unpure gold are disappointing - there being no shortage of the precious metal.

    Shoppers in Johannesburg are offered a wide-ranging selection of domestic and imported goods, but it is largely the white population that is enjoying the fruits of the boom. South Africa's all-white parliament is aware of growing black discontent as despairing millions from long unemployment queues.

    Prime Minister Peter Botha did launch the 'Verligte' or enlightenment campaign last year to press his plan to allow blacks to hold certain jobs at present reserved for whites. But this provided a white-backlash from the miner's union which saw its entrenched privilege threatened.

    Following the boom, the surcharge on imports, which was cut last year from 12.5 percent to 7.5 percent, looks likely to be scrapped altogether, thanks to the increased gold revenues, and orders for luxury cars and swimming pools are reported to be flowing in.

    Wages are rising and poorly paid teachers and nurses can expect sizeable pay increases this year. The tax rate for workers is also low-below ten percent.

    But the new boom is also bringing an increase of trained immigrants to the country. The government's assistance policy to encourage white immigrants has provoked protests from black critics who claim the apartheid ideology of the past, which hampered the training of South Africa's own workforce, is now to blame for this importation of expensive skilled labour.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9KR2GJSULR0YB27UQJ8GQ7C0A
    Media URN:
    VLVA9KR2GJSULR0YB27UQJ8GQ7C0A
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/02/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:48:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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