• Short Summary

    WASHINGTON, U.S.A. & UNITED NATIONS

    President Ronald Reagan has denied attempting to overthrow Nicaragua's Sandinista government, but at the same time called it a Marxist regime supporting leftist rebels in El Salvador.

  • Description

    1. WASHINGTON, USA
    GV Reporters at news conference 0.05
    2. SCU President Reagan speaking on Nicaraguan question (3 shots) (SOT) 1.29
    3. UNITED NATIONS, NEW YORK
    (MUTE)
    GV PAN Victor Hugo Tinoco, Nicaraguan Vice Foreign Minister 1.36
    4. (SOUND)
    CU PULL BACK TO SCU Tinoco speaks on U.S. role in Nicaraguan affairs (SOT) 2.42
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ. 2):
    REAGAN: "I am not going to get...I could not, would not possibly talk about such things, but may I point out that this whole controversy over Nicaragua is ignoring some realities -- that the Nicaraguan government is a revolutionary government that took power by force, but with the promise of democratic elections, none of which have taken place, and all of this was under the previous administration. The previous administration, however, did recognise this government of Nicaragua, sought to help it with considerable financial aid and withdraw that aid long before we were here when it became apparent that the government had become completely Marxist, had turned away and thrown out some of the democratic groups that had supported them and fought with them in the revolution to bring democracy to Nicaragua and were then no longer a part of the government. But also, the cut-off of funds was because the Nicaraguan government had pledged to the United States that it would not attempt to overthrow any other governments in Central America, particularly El Salvador, by helping the insurgents there, the guerrillas, and they violate that promise."
    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ. 4):
    TINOCO: "First of all, we think that it has to be defined what kind of threat Nicaragua's facing. What is the role of the United States? Because then when we define what is the threat that Nicaragua's facing, then we will decide what is the level, what is the acceptable level of armaments that Nicaragua can handle. Then, I think that this a great problem, but that is, that's a very, very, very difficult and complex matter. But it's very important now to stop the revolution of the counter-revolutionary violence in the northern border."
    REPORTER: "The Boland agreement in the United States".
    TINOCO: "Yes, I know, I know...."
    REPORTER: "Do you see the U.S. violating this in any way?"
    TINOCO: "We think, we believe very fervently that the United States is not only violating the Boland Amendment, but it's violating, too, the neutrality act. It's very clear that they are violating the neutrality act of the United States, and they are violating the United Nations Charter."
    InitialsRdeL/SW


    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: WASHINGTON, U.S.A. & UNITED NATIONS

    President Ronald Reagan has denied attempting to overthrow Nicaragua's Sandinista government, but at the same time called it a Marxist regime supporting leftist rebels in El Salvador. Mr. Regan's remarks at an impromptu news conference in Washington on April 14, were the first such statements specifically rejecting suggestions that the United States was involved in moves to topple the Sandinistas. The previous day (April 13) Democratic representative Edward Boland claimed there was strong evidence that the Reagan administration was giving military aid to anti-government guerrillas in Nicaragua. Congressman Boland had an amendment passed by Congress in 1982 which barred the use of Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) funds for the purpose of overthrowing the Sandinista government. President Reagan said his administration was trying to encourage democracy and peace in Central America, and was not engaged in activities levelled at the Nicaraguan government. He also accused the Sandinista government of not keeping to its pledge of holding democratic elections. At the United Nations, Nicaragua's Vice Foreign Minister Victor Hugo Tinoco accused the United States of supporting counter revolutionary groups attempting to infiltrate into border areas. Mr. Tinoco charged the United States with violating its own neutrality, the United Nations charter, and international law. Although President Reagan denies the United charter, and international law. Although President Reagan denies the United States is trying to overthrow the Nicaraguan government, there is evidence to suggest his administration would like it to happen. Apart from the military pressure which Congressman Boland alleges, the U.S. is also applying economic pressure by forcing a cutback in loans from various international groups. The result is widespread shortages and economic conditions for the poor that are even worse than they were under the Somoza government.

    Source: NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY INCORPORATED & UNITED NATIONS TELEVISION

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9KE5P9LVJHKA2B9WPKZTLF7AX
    Media URN:
    VLVA9KE5P9LVJHKA2B9WPKZTLF7AX
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    14/04/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:43:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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