• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Two policemen were injured, one seriously, during rioting in Londonderry on Monday (25 May) night and Tuesday morning, following the funeral of Republican hunger striker Patsy O'Hara.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Funeral procession for Patsy O'Hara in Londonderry (2 shots)
    0.06

    2.
    GV Flag-draped coffin being carried at cemetery
    0.13

    3.
    CU & GV Masked guerrillas salute (2 shots)
    0.16

    4.
    CU Elderly man paying respects
    0.26

    5.
    SV Guerrillas fire salute, kneel at side of coffin, and mourners clap (2 shots)
    0.46

    6.
    SV Coffin carried to grave
    0.53

    7.
    GV England (MUTE) Coffin of Paul Bulman carried by soldiers
    1.02

    8.
    GV Crowd watches as coffin is carried and mourners follow (4 shots)
    1.20

    9.
    SV Flowers at graveside
    1.28

    10.
    GV PAN FROM Policeman watching crowd TO chaplain and Bulman's parents at graveside
    1.36

    11.
    SCU Bulman's parents
    1.39

    12.
    GV ZOOM OUT (SOUND) Bugler playing Last Post as Bulman's parents stand at graveside (2 shots)
    1.49

    13.
    GV British Army troops fire salute
    1.52

    14.
    SV (SOUND) Captured weapons on display in Ulster
    1.58

    15.
    CU Anti-tank rocket and other equipment (2 shots)
    2.08

    16.
    CU Weapons including nuts, bolts and nails from blast bombs
    2.13

    17.
    SV RUC Chief Constable Herman speaking
    2.35

    18.
    SV PAN Newsmen taking notes as Herman holds plastic bullet
    2.42


    SPEECH ON FILM (TRANSCRIPT)



    HERMAN: (SEQ 17) "And this is the RPG-7. It even looks a horrific weapon. People all agree with that. It's certainly not something for a street disorder. In fact, it's a weapon for open warfare. It's an anti-tank gun."





    Initials BB



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Two policemen were injured, one seriously, during rioting in Londonderry on Monday (25 May) night and Tuesday morning, following the funeral of Republican hunger striker Patsy O'Hara. The men suffered cuts and burns when a crate of petrol bombs which they were investigating exploded. Hundreds of petrol bombs were thrown at police and British troops as youths rioted in mainly Catholic-Republica areas of the city. O'Hara was the fourth man to starve himself to death as part of a campaign for convicted guerrillas as to be treated a prisoners of war. The government has rejected their demands.

    SYNOPSIS: Patsy O'Hara who died in the Maze Prison of Belfast's outskirts on Thursday (21 May) was buried on Monday after a Requiem Mass. About 1,500 Irish Republicans attended the Mass at a Londonderry church.

    O'Hara's coffin was carried to the grave by six masked members of the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), a splinter group of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) to which he belonged.

    The outlawed INLA treated the funeral as a burial with full military honours.

    And the gestures was not unappreciated by the mourners.

    Since the hunger strikes began on 1 March, 30 people have been killed in violence stemming from the campaign.

    On Tuesday (26 May), the day after O'Hara's funeral, the friends, relatives and colleagues of two of the most recent British Army casualties were mourning. While this funeral was taking place at North Shields for Driver Paul Bulman, his colleague, Rifleman John King, aged 20, was being cremated at Oxford. Bulman and King were two of the five British soldiers killed when a powerful bomb obliterated their Saracen armoured car, near Newry.

    The flowers came from those who could not be present at the burial, following a private family service attended by some 500 people at a cemetery chapel near his home at North Shields. An army chaplain conducted the service as Bulman's parents mourned.

    A bugler from his Royal Corps of Transport unit sounded the Last Post and a burial escort fired a last salute.

    At the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) Headquarters on Belfast's outskirts, police displayed confiscated guerrilla weapons on Tuesday as a justification for maintaining use of the plastic baton round used by British troops. RUC Chief Constable, Jack Herman showed newsmen petrol and acid bombs, and the deadly blast bomb, filled with nuts, bolts and nails.

    The Chief Constable described the plastic bullet as a purely defensive weapon, without which British troops would be helpless against rioters.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9JBBITVNIG3MSQCYXBFTLL566
    Media URN:
    VLVA9JBBITVNIG3MSQCYXBFTLL566
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/05/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:41:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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