• Short Summary

    The Zimbabwe Prime Minister Robert Mugabe has defended his decision to move thousands of former guerrillas to the Chitungweza township south of Salisbury.

  • Description

    1.
    GV & APN Old huts in Chitungweza, Zimbabwe to new town
    0.08

    2.
    SV Soldiers setting up tent (4 shots)
    0.24

    3.
    GV Soldier and tent PAN TO Houses
    0.32

    4.
    GV PAN New houses
    0.40

    5.
    GV & SV Men working (6 shots)
    1.22

    6.
    SV ZOOM OUT Soldier and compound
    1.30

    7.
    GV PAN Houses (2 shots)
    1.39




    Initials AM/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Zimbabwe Prime Minister Robert Mugabe has defended his decision to move thousands of former guerrillas to the Chitungweza township south of Salisbury. The men have been confined to bush camps since the end of fighting in the country.

    SYNOPSIS: Much rebuilding has been carried out at the Chitungweza township to accommodate the guerrillas. Mr. Mugabe said 35-thousand nationalist fighters of his Zanla army and Mr. Joshua Nkomo's Zipra army had gathered in assembly camps since the ceasefire last December. The government had resolved to end their suffering of being confined to these bush camps.

    Mr. Mugabe said the necessary precautions would be taken to ensure that the men moved to Chitungweza and another camp near Bulawayo would not cause trouble. He said he'd asked the security forces' joint high command to give him a satisfactory plan to ensure the guerrillas would be controlled and that discipline would be maintained. So far three thousand members of Zanla and Zipra have been integrated into Zimbabwe's army. But Mr. Mugabe says he cannot see the formation of the army being completed by the end of this year as he'd originally wanted. He said former Rhodesia forces had not integrated.

    Mr. Mugabe's concern over morale at the guerrilla camps was shown earlier this month when he paid a secret visit to an assembly camp near the white farming settlement of Mtoko, 100 miles east of Salisbury. The camp ranks among the most troublesome of the country's fourteen assembly camps. Some of the guerrillas attacked police posts recently and many of the areas white farmers are leaving.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9GDV6NBEMO1WZOIHPSCEF7K8I
    Media URN:
    VLVA9GDV6NBEMO1WZOIHPSCEF7K8I
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/09/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:40:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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