• Short Summary

    Amateur radio operators from all over Greece gathered in Athens on Wednesday for the start of an exhibition devoted to their hobby.

  • Description

    Amateur radio operators from all over Greece gathered in Athens on Wednesday for the start of an exhibition devoted to their hobby. As they did so, however, the Greek Government announced that it would be imposing new controls over the operation of "priate" stations--as amateur radio transmitters are called in Greece.

    On the roof of the Zappeion Palace, where the exhibition was held, a large aerial moved as it transmitted the calls of the operators inside.

    A wide variety of equipment, including receivers, transmitters and transformers was on display during the exhibition, which featured the work of the National Union of Greek Amateur Radio Operators. Many models of larger pieces of equipment were also on show. Diplomas and call signs decorated the walls.

    During the exhibition, the amateur operators took opportunity to talk over their radios to friends in a number of different countries.

    But in future, the amateurs will be watched more closely by the authorities. On the grounds of security and the situation in the region, all such radio operations will henceforth be under the control of the armed forces. And, following a new to be passed by the Greek Consultative Committee, as the small parliament is called, no-one will able to operate or possess an amateur radio station without clearance from the military authorities
    It's expected that most amateurs will be able to continue with their hobby under the new law so long as they have no police record for political, criminal or ideological offenses.

    At the moment, there are about 200 amateur radio stations in Greece, but this number may be affected by the new law. The Government says another reason they're imposing these controls is because the wide variety o??? frequencies in use for amateur purposes can affect military and civil and aviation communications.

    SYNOPSIS: Athens was the gathering point on Wednesday for radio amateurs from all over Greece, when an exhibition devoted to their hobby opened at the Zappeion Palace. But as the exhibition got under way, it was announced by the Greek Government that it would be imposing new controls over the operation of "pirate" stations, as amateur radio transmitters are called in Greece.

    Call signs and diplomas decorated the exhibition walls as amateur radio operators got a chance to look at a variety of equipment. Among the displays were many receivers, transformers and transmitters. Operators also took the opportunity to call up their friends in other countries.

    The exhibit featured the work of the National Union of Greek Radio Operators, who's banner hung over the displays.

    But in future, the amateurs will be watched more closely by the authorities. Because of what are called security reasons, all such radio operations will now be put under armed forces control. Under a new law to be passed soon, on-one can operate or own amateur radio equipment without special military

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9A9PPLDDUFGNZ9MD8MKFD1WZR
    Media URN:
    VLVA9A9PPLDDUFGNZ9MD8MKFD1WZR
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/05/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:17:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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