• Short Summary

    Britain's Pearce Commission arrived in London on Sunday (12 March) after finishing its two-month task of testing black and white opinion in Rhodesia of the Anglo-Rhodesian settlement terms.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Salisbury airport building
    0.03

    2.
    MV Africans with placards - CU ditto (2 shots)
    0.18

    3.
    MV Lord Pearce & party saying farewell on tarmac
    0.51

    4.
    MV Pearce talking to camera - (SOF IN AT 35,10.7,56
    1.09

    5.
    CU Pearce on arrival in London interviewed
    1.39

    6.
    MV Pearce down steps & out of airport (silent)
    1.44

    7.
    CU Pearce in car (silent)
    1.47

    8.
    MC Car away (silent)
    1.52


    PEARCE: "I'm not going to discuss this thing beyond to say that I am satisfied we shall be able to give a fair and comprehensive report which anybody can see why we came to any conclusion which we do come to and there it is and that's the job."



    REPORTER: "Do you see it as a matter of urgency now to produce this report?"



    PEARCE: "I see it as a matter of getting on with doing as quickly as we can the job properly".




    Initials SGM/0213 SGM/0230



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Britain's Pearce Commission arrived in London on Sunday (12 March) after finishing its two-month task of testing black and white opinion in Rhodesia of the Anglo-Rhodesian settlement terms. On Saturday (11 March), black demonstrators chanted a final "no" at Salisbury airport as members of the Commission departed.

    The Commission, led by former British Judge Lord Pearce, tried to discover whether the settlement formula -- promising an end to a six and-a-half-year-old constitutional feud -- was acceptable to the people of Rhodesia as a whole.

    Upon his arrival in London, Lord Pearce said that the report on his findings could be ready within a month. He said the Commission now had to assess the information they'd gathered while in Rhodesia. He also told reporters that he was satisfied the Commission could come up with a fair and comprehensive report.

    He spoke to a reporter from the British Broadcasting Corporation.

    SYNOPSIS: Passing through Salisbury airport on the way to London on Saturday were members of the Pearce Commission. They ended a two-month visit to Rhodesia to test opinion on the Anglo-Rhodesian settlement A number of Africans were on hand to chant a final "no".

    The Commission, led by former British Judge Lord Pearce, tried to discover whether the settlement formula, which promises an end to a six-and-a-half-year-old constitutional feud, was acceptable to all Rhodesians. Under the terms for settling the Anglo-Rhodesian dispute, which was triggered when the British colony unilaterally declared independence in 1965, Rhodesia would get legal independence under a white minority government -- with majority rule the eventual role.

    There was mass opposition to the terms of the proposals among Rhodesia's Africans, and violence broke out soon after the Commission's arrival. The newly-formed African National Congress was held responsible. Upon arriving in London on Sunday, Lord Pearce was asked about his job.

    SOF STARTS AT 1 MIN, 9 SECS, 43 FT, 13.1 METRES
    "I'm not going to discuss......"
    SOF ENDS AT 1 MIN, 39 SECS, 62 FT, 18.9 METRES.

    "....the job properly".

    Lord Pearce hopes the report will be ready in a month. Either way, it's reported difficulties lie ahead as a "no" may anger whites and a "yes" might anger blacks.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA9A8E7CPWJIYYN2XECAFDIJ09S
    Media URN:
    VLVA9A8E7CPWJIYYN2XECAFDIJ09S
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/03/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:52:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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