• Short Summary

    CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

    INTRODUCTION: In South Africa, around 500 blacks are living in the open bush 16 kilometres (10 miles) outside Cape Town, at Nyanga.

  • Description

    CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA


    GV PAN Shelters in open space PAN TO people singing 0.15
    SV PAN Priest standing next to cross preaching to listening crowd (2 shots) 0.34
    SCU Priest preaching with English translator 0.42
    SV Smoking fire PAN TO shelter frame 0.50
    GV People sitting around open land after shelters taken down (2 shots) 1.00
    CU Deputy Minister Dr. Morrison, evicts newsmen from area 1.23
    SV & GV Police clearing press away (2 shots) 1.32
    SV PAN People's Committee walk off for talks with officials 1.46
    SV Blacks singing around cross (4 shots) 2.22 SPEECH (TRANSCRIPT) SEQ. 6

    MORRISON: "No, no that I can't allow. The press is not allowed here. No the press is not allowed at all so you cannot take films here and please remove your cameras."
    NEWSMEN: But we understood by seeing the SABC here etc. that we were allowed to be here..." (INTERRUPTION) MORRISON: "No, no the ban is on the press and the media."

    Background: CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

    INTRODUCTION: In South Africa, around 500 blacks are living in the open bush 16 kilometres (10 miles) outside Cape Town, at Nyanga. They come to the area from their tribal homelands in search of work, and have brought their families with them. All are in the township illegally, without passes needed under South Africa's apartheid laws. Police have torn down makeshift tents the squatters have put up. Opposition MP's and liberals have condemned the government action. The government is reported to be unofficially allowing tents to be put up overnight--so long as they are removed by 4 a.m.

    SYNOPSIS: The shelters are all the Nyanga inhabitants have to protect them from the elements.

    There have been storms, hail, and gale force winds recently. And the people have no toilet facilities.

    Whites have been banned from the area, but at the weekend (15,16 August) the government decided to allow a party in with food and blankets. Previously, only churchmen had been permitted. Interdenominational clergymen and squatters led a prayer service.

    Opposition MPs have cautiously welcomed the government's decision -- but say there is no interim provision for the homeless.

    Fires and plastic tents are the only comforts the squatters have against the cold nights.

    But even these have to be removed every morning. Restrictions on the press remain, as Deputy Development Minister George Morrison pointed out to newsmen.

    The squatters' plight has received much coverage throughout the world. And the government has been under pressure to reform living conditions.

    A twelve-member committee has been formed by the squatters to talk to the authorities. It wants to co-ordinate the distribution of clothing and food, and pass on complaints.

    The government has announced that 1,000 jobs are available for the Nyanga squatters in Transvaal. But Opposition politicians point out that families will be split up because the jobs are of single status only. And a civil rights group fears the jobs will mean indentured labour - as a spokesman put it, "verging on slavery". But the squatters are still at Nyanga. And nobody can say how long it will be before the police policy of forcibly removing tents will be reintroduced.

    Source: REUTERS - MICHAEL GAVSHON

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA96T96TAM3UHVQ8FYE4366TQQO
    Media URN:
    VLVA96T96TAM3UHVQ8FYE4366TQQO
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/08/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:22:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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