• Short Summary

    Japan and the United States on Thursday (June 17) signed an agreement for the return of the last Second World War-lost Japanese territory held by the Americans--the island of Okinawa, and others in the Ryukyu group.

  • Description

    Japan and the United States on Thursday (June 17) signed an agreement for the return of the last Second World War-lost Japanese territory held by the Americans--the island of Okinawa, and others in the Ryukyu group.

    In a ceremony televised live between Tokyo and Washington, the United States Secretary of State, Mr. William Rogers, and the Japanese Foreign Minister, Mr. Kiichi Aichi, signed the agreement to return Okinawa to Japan in 1972.

    Speeches during the half-hour ceremony--first by Mr. Rogers, then Mr. Aichi and finally the Japanese Prime Minister, Mr. Eisaku Sato--hailed the event as a milestone for the creation of a healthier and more durable partnership between Japan and the United States.

    President Nixon did not appear at the Washington ceremony, but a message from him was read by Mr. Rogers.

    Coinciding with the signing, demonstrators were marching through Tokyo, other Japanese cities and Okinawa, protesting the terms of the agreement which will allow the Americans to maintain military bases on Okinawa.

    SYNOPSIS: At the State Department in Washington on Thursday night, the final agreement handing back control of Okinawa, the main island in the Ryukyu Group, was signed by Japanese Foreign Minister, Mr. Kiichi Aichi and U. S. Secretary of State, Mr. William Rogers. The agreement was signed in a ceremony televised live--by satellite in both the United States and Japan. Okinawa is the last Japanese territory held by the Americans as a result of World War Two.

    Speeches during the half-hour ceremony, by Mr. Rogers and Mr. Aichi, hailed the event as a milestone for the creation of a healthier and more durable partnership between the United States and Japan. In Tokyo, the United States Ambassador, Mr. Meyer and Japanese Prime Minister, Mr. Sato, signed the Agreement.

    But the solidarity of the two governments was challenged by the young of Japan. In Tokyo thousands of young demonstrators took to the streets to express their opposition to the fact that the United States was to be allowed to maintain military bases on Okinawa.

    Police were called in to use water cannon to disperse the demonstrators--and cameramen caught up in the struggle suffered slight injuries.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA90VMFS8Q6DCTOGCNY8ZUJ7VD4
    Media URN:
    VLVA90VMFS8Q6DCTOGCNY8ZUJ7VD4
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    18/06/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:35:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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