• Short Summary

    Iraq has stepped up its war effort after Sunday's (5 October) ceasefire was ignored.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs Smoke from oil depot fire drifting over khorramshahr. (MUTE) (2 SHOTS)
    0.14

    2.
    SV Iraqi troops walking through docks at Khorramshahr as damaged ship burns. (MUTE) (2 SHOTS)
    0.29

    3.
    SV Iraqi soldier climbing on tank at docks.
    0.34

    4.
    SV & GV Iranian border post showing bullet holes from heavy firing and damaged vehicles.
    0.51

    5.
    GV Iraqi armed column advancing on Khorramshahr.
    1.04

    6.
    GV & SVs Iraqi artillery firing. (2 SHOTS)
    1.38

    7.
    GV Artillery continues firing on Khorramshahr.
    1.54

    8.
    GV & SV Iraqi army column at standstill outside Khorramshahr with soldiers in jubilant mood and waving to cameras. (2 SHOTS)
    2.02

    9.
    GV & SV Crowd around wreckage of Iranian jet. (2 SHOTS)
    2.19

    10.
    GV Soldiers in street in Khorramshahr.
    2.22

    11.
    SV Rifles being handed out to reservists in Teheran. (3 SHOTS)
    2.53

    12.
    SV PAN Supplies being loaded onto truck from ambulance.
    3.07

    13.
    SV PAN Gun waving reservists drive of fin buses.
    3.18




    Initials JS/



    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Iraq has stepped up its war effort after Sunday's (5 October) ceasefire was ignored. By Monday (6 October), Iraqi troops had virtually taken over the oil port of Khorramshahr. Commanders in the city admitted they did not control all of the city but said most of it, including the port, was in possession of Iraq. Iran has denied the claim.

    SYNOPSIS: The latest pictures from Iraqi Television show the city of Khorramshahr under attack. The bombardment began again on Sunday (5 October) only a few hours after the ceasefire started. The Iraqi commanders in the city say the Iranians ignored the ceasefire, so they returned their fire. Several foreign ships were caught in the barrage and badly damaged. Iraqi infantry now control the port area.

    The Iraqi advance into Iran was held up for three days at the frontier. Some of the fiercest fighting was at a remote customs post where escape for the Iranian defenders was made impossible after their vehicles were destroyed by rocket and shall-fire. A few did manage to flee down the road to Khorramshahr -- pursued by the Iraqis. But if Iraq was expecting to capture the vital oil port swiftly, they were mistaken.

    Now the Iraqi guns are pounding away at the Iranian forces in the south of the city from their desert artillery position twenty five miles (40 kilometres) away. Tons of one hundred and thirty millimetre shells have been laid out and the guns have been firing salvos day and night. Yes they still have not been able to dislodged the Iranians completely. The war looks like it will drag on for a long time.

    In the swirling dust they have come to something of a mili???ry stalemat???. Both sides seem bent on destroying each others' oil refineries and pipelines.

    One Sunday (5 October) journalists were taken to the port by the Iraqi authorities. Soldiers, weary after fourteen days on the front line, were in a jubilant mood. Only hours before, this street hand been the scene of vicious fighting as Iraqi tanks and troops arrived. In that fighting, Iranian Air Force jets had bombed the approaching columns and an American-built F5 jet had been brought down in the desert.

    Pictures from the Iranian side of the war are rare. These from Teheran show the emergency call-up of their reservists and their departure for the front line. Reports from Iran say the emergency scheme could put 600,000 men under arms - the first serious step towards re-building the army since the Shah was overthrown. Ayatollah Khomeini is said to have approved the mobilisation scheme, but other Ayatollahs are worried that such an army could prove to powerful a political force in the future. Meanwhile, the Iranian Pars news agency has reported an offer from the Soviet Union to grant Iran military aid. But Iranian Prime Minister, Mohammad Ali Rajai, said that as long as Soviet-Iranian relations remained unsatisfactory his country was not ready to trade its independence for anything the Kremlin had to offer.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA90FTSE6W52UB2X36E54ID3FP1
    Media URN:
    VLVA90FTSE6W52UB2X36E54ID3FP1
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    06/10/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:19:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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