• Short Summary

    Like other Asian cities, Kuala Lumpur, the Malaysian capital, has decided to clean itself up.?

  • Description

    1.
    SV PEOPLE CLEARING LETTER (2 shots)
    0.08

    2.
    SV FRUITS LELLERS
    0.11

    3.
    SV PEOPLE THROWING WOODEN BOX IN TRUCK
    0.18

    4.
    SCU POLICEMAN LOOKS ON
    0.21

    5.
    SV MAN WRITING ON PAPER AND DISTRIBUTE IT (3 shots)
    0.38

    6.
    SV MAN PUTTING BICYCLE INTO TRUCK
    0.45

    7.
    SCU MALAY MAN SMOKES CIGARETTE
    0.48

    8.
    CU CIGARETTES END ON GROUND
    0.51

    9.
    SV MAN BEING ARRESTED FOR THROWING AWAY A CIGARETTE
    0.59

    10.
    CC POLICE STATION SIGN ZOOM OUT TO TRUCK FULL OF BICYCLES IN FRONT OF STATION
    1.04

    11.
    SV INT.PEOPLE PAYING FINES AT POLICE STATION (3 shots)
    1.17



    Initials jt/vs/jkl/as



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Like other Asian cities, Kuala Lumpur, the Malaysian capital, has decided to clean itself up. Municipal and police teams are now waging and all-out war against litter-bugs. Offenders are arrested without a warrant and hauled off to the nearest police station to be fined on the spot.

    The new anti-litter laws came into effect on December 1. The city fathers gave the people three weeks' grace to get used to them - and then pounced on those who hadn't. No seasonal goodwill was shown to offenders.

    The law is directed not only against people who throw rubbish on the streets, but also those who block footpaths with, for example, scooters and bicycles or stalls and shoe-shine boxes.

    On the first day of the campaign, 61 people were arrested within two hours and 12 motor-cycles and 20 bicycles carted away. The first to be booked was a man who threw away a cigarette end. He was followed by a girl caught washing dishes outside a coffee shop. Fines ranged from $M25 to $M50 ($US8.3 to $US16.6). First offenders can be fined as high as $M500 and double that for a second offence.

    Kuala Lumpur's tough anti-rubbish laws follow those enforced in Singapore and Macao, among other Asian cities, where remarkable results have been achieved.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8ZP3DIUIEQR9WIK16DUYI7R1T
    Media URN:
    VLVA8ZP3DIUIEQR9WIK16DUYI7R1T
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/12/1969
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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