• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Yugoslavia is facing daunting energy problems.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Street in Ljubljana
    0.10

    2.
    SVs Coal deposit with people in trucks and cars with trailers buying and transporting coal (5 shots)
    0.43

    3.
    SV Queues of people (3 shots)
    0.56

    4.
    GV Petrol station, pumps and motorists arriving for fuel (4 shots)
    1.17

    5.
    CUs Heating oil pumps at service station, containers filled, payments made (3 shots)
    1.33




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Yugoslavia is facing daunting energy problems. Power needs have almost doubled every decade, since the end of World War Two, in keeping pace with the economic development of the country. But in the face of galloping inflation, with January figures showing a rise of almost 47 percent this year, there is hope for a brighter energy future if current exploration in the Adriatic produces good oil deposits.

    SYNOPSIS: Yugoslavs have been experiencing spiralling price increases on everything from food and consumer goods to energy, transport, telephone and postal services.

    But the energy crisis is even more crucial. Although the country covers about 30 to 40 percent of its oil needs, its production of crude oil is declining. And the severe balance of payments deficit makes it increasingly difficult to buy oil on the world market. The quality of the large deposits of brown coal is poor and experts say it will run out in 50 years. Heating in public buildings and apartments are lowered to 18 degrees Centigrade (62.5 Fahrenheit) and heating prices have risen 76 percent this year.

    The government, which controls some prices has appealed to industries to curb the increases. But under the unique system of workers' self-management, prices for nearly half the goods and services result from a decentralised decision-making process. Recent attempts to lessen petrol consumption by restricting driving days of motorists was replaced by a rise in petrol prices. Consumption dropped sharply, and public transport gained in popularity.

    Heating oil is now sold only in gas station containers. But if the Adriatic yields some oil treasures and the first nuclear power station at Krsko begins production next autumn, Yugoslavia's energy crisis should see some improvement.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8VRBZBANHE86MVQIHGJW7P464
    Media URN:
    VLVA8VRBZBANHE86MVQIHGJW7P464
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/02/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:34:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment