• Short Summary

    About 70 per cent of Malaysia's three million eligible voters went to the polls on Saturday (24 August) and gave Prime Minister Tun Abdul Razak and his National Front Coalition a massive victory.

  • Description

    About 70 per cent of Malaysia's three million eligible voters went to the polls on Saturday (24 August) and gave Prime Minister Tun Abdul Razak and his National Front Coalition a massive victory.

    The Front, a multi-racial confederation of nine parties, won 120 of the 130 declared parliamentary seats, with the results of 24 constituencies still to come. Apart form gaining a stranglehold in parliament, the Front also won control of all State Assemblies except in Sarawak, where voting is staggered over three weeks because of communication problems.

    As far as the opposition parties are concerned the Democratic Action Party had seven seats with 80 per cent of the election results declared, the Social Justice Party, Pekemas, only one. This was held by Pekemas leader Dr. Tan Chee Khoon, whose party suffered a crushing defeat since it previously held five seats and had hoped to win 12.

    The last Malaysian elections, in 1969, were marred by bloody racial riots between Malays and Chinese but the polls on Saturday were the most peaceful in the country's history. Malays comprise nearly 50 per cent of the population, Chinese make up 37 per cent, Indians nine per cent and indigenous people the remainder.

    SYNOPSIS: Parliament House in Kuala Lumpur, the focus on Saturday for Malaysia's voters, who went to the polls to elect the members who will represent them there for the next five years.

    Despite plenty of pre-election publicity from the opposition parties the result was a landslide victory for Prime Minister Tun Abdul Razak's National Front Coaltion.

    The Front is a multi-racial confederation of nine parties and it won one hundred and twenty of the one hundred and thirty declared parliamentary seats, with the results of twenty four constituencies still to come in.

    The nineteen-sixty-nine elections in Malaysia resulted in bloody clashe??? between Malays and Chinese, but this year's were the quietest in the country's history. Although police were on standby no incidents were reported.

    The election was a disappointment for the opposition Social Justice Party, Pekemas, whose leader Dr. Tan Chee Khoon was the only candidate to retain his seat. In the last parliament they held five seats. The other main opposition party. Democratic Action, had seven seats when eighty per cent of the results were declared. Tun Razak's victory was considered a foregone conclusion as he is hero-vorshipped by a large proportion of the Malay population.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8SKJKI6DGXTEQJYLBA4K43OA7
    Media URN:
    VLVA8SKJKI6DGXTEQJYLBA4K43OA7
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    25/08/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:21:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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