• Short Summary

    A West German architect who lost his left hand and four fingers of his other hand during the Second world War, won all three throwing events on Monday(16 September) the opening day of the first World Games for the Multi-Disabled.

  • Description

    A West German architect who lost his left hand and four fingers of his other hand during the Second world War, won all three throwing events on Monday(16 September) the opening day of the first World Games for the Multi-Disabled. Herr Aloid Beez, now 40, was injured by Allied combing when he was 11.

    He threw the javelin 155 feet (47.2 mtrs), gripping it between his palm and the little finger of his right hand. He threw the discus 150 ft (45.7 mtrs) and the shot 46 ft (14 mtes), better results than many club athletes can achieve.

    The week-long Games are being staged at Britain's Stoke Mandeville Sports stadium in Aylesbury, the first to be built specifically for the disabled. There are 220 disabled athletes from 14 countries competing under rules which the organisers hope will become a model for future competitions.

    Competitors are divided into four categories in accordance with their disabilities: gross, severe, mild or nil.

    The events are also categorised for competitors with different disabilities. There was a full programme of events on Monday including bowls and high jump for the blind and the throwing events for single arm amputees.

    The British Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, officially opened the Games on Sunday(15 September). He described them as an expression of the athletes' confidence in themselves and in their contribution to the community.

    SYNOPSIS: Stoke Mandeville sports stadium in Britain is the first to be designed especially for the disabled. It is a fitting venue for the First World Games for the Multi-Disabled, which began on Monday.

    All three throwing events on the first day were won by a West German architect who lost his left hand and four fingers on the other as a child when he was injured in Allied wartime bombing.

    The bowling on the first day was restricted to blind competitors. After a few practice shots, and quidance form friends the bowlers they have to rely on the own instincts and skill.

    Each of the events is staged for competitors with different handicaps. Leg amputees and paraplegics will have their turn later in the week.

    Two-hundred-and-twenty competitors form fourteen countries are taking part in the Games under rules which the organisers hope will become a model for future competitions.

    The games have been staged by the International Sports Organisation for the Disabled which has been fighting hard for better sporting opportunities and facilities.

    The high jump takes a special kind of bravery for the blind. The smallest miscalculation means hopes of clearing the bar are dashed.

    Another blind competitor proves he can overcome his handicap. In many events, the disabled have tuned in performances worthy of good club athletes, making the Games the success the organisers had hoped for.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8RWC2U796FEMIAFDMHZOXUZ5W
    Media URN:
    VLVA8RWC2U796FEMIAFDMHZOXUZ5W
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/09/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:59:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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