• Short Summary

    Four years ago, Birmingham, Alabama, agonized through weeks of disorders.

    The city's Negro community was mobilized?

  • Description


    1963 RIOTS IN BIRMINGHAM & POLICE USING HOSEPIPES TO DISPERSE CROWD 1967 KELLY INGRATO PAR, CITY HALL, PHONE BOOTH CU. JORN NIXON. LOCAL NEGRO SPEAKING NEGRO POLICEMEN



    TRANSCRIPT: Nixon says: "Birmingham still has a long way to go."




    Initials



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Four years ago, Birmingham, Alabama, agonized through weeks of disorders.

    The city's Negro community was mobilized to take to the streets to win the same rights which Negroes already had gained in other large cities.

    The demonstrations began with school children...But soon hundreds...and then thousands...of demonstrators were carrying their protests through the streets.

    Birmingham's police...under Public Safety Director Eugene (Bull) Connors were joined by Alabama state troopers. The disorders continued.

    Inevitably...and after several false starts...the conflict was moved from the streets to the conference table. By then..Birmingham was wounded city... and the whole world knew it.

    Today...the scars have disappeared from Kelly Ingram Park, the scene of the worst disorders.

    Grass grows again where the trucks and trailers of the State Highway patrol once formed a combat command center.

    The bark stripped from the trades by the high-pressure hoses of the police, has grown back.

    At the height of a demonstration...a reporter, calling in his story...was trapped in this phone booth... while demonstrators rocked it...and threatened to kill him. Now....it is just another telephone booth.

    Not far from Kelly Ingram Park is City Hall. There Mayor Albert Boutwell...who took office in the midst of the demonstrations...presides over a city trying to live down its recent past.

    Dr. John Nixon, local Negro leader, admits there has been progress...but not enough.

    Birmingham still has its problems.

    There is no forgetting that four Negro girls died at their Sunday school desks in the worst of several bombings...all unsolved.

    Negroes now are on the police force...and not only in Negro neighbourhoods.

    Public facilities have been desegregated.

    What Negro leaders want now are more jobs, better housing, higher quality education...and better treatment by the police.

    It is perhaps significant that what Negroes want now in Birmingham is no more than what they are asking in other cities....and not all of them in the South.

    This is Wendell Harris reporting.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8RUWF6B3RDL4D1QXNPEGNNFWG
    Media URN:
    VLVA8RUWF6B3RDL4D1QXNPEGNNFWG
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/05/1967
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:04:29:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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