• Short Summary

    Political rivalry without violence is the crucial lesson Angola is striving to master as it moves swiftly towards total independence from Portugal in November.

  • Description

    1.
    LV ZOOM IN TO GV ACROSS Bay TO Luanda city centre
    0.11

    2.
    GV ZOOM IN TO SV Banco de Angola with UNITA slogans on pillars (2 shots)
    0.22

    3.
    SV Wall with FNLA slogans
    0.27

    4.
    GV World War I memorial with MPLA and FNLA slogans
    0.27

    5.
    GV Soldiers on lorry at side of road
    0.34

    6.
    GV People at Pepsi truck PAN TO military lorry along road
    0.51

    7.
    CU ZOOM OUT TO LV ParK in popular quarter
    1.00

    8.
    GV Market square with people carrying goods and talking in groups (5 shots)
    1.18

    9.
    GV PAN Palm lined boulevard and bay
    1.32

    10.
    SV ZOOM OUT TO GV People bathing in sea
    1.42



    Initials BB/2155



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Political rivalry without violence is the crucial lesson Angola is striving to master as it moves swiftly towards total independence from Portugal in November.

    The former colony, potentially one of Africa's richest states, will strike out on its own form November II -- just over eighteen months after the fall of Portugal's totalitarian government paved the way for a peaceful independence settlement.

    Life is the capital, Luanda, today, fully reflects the sudden flowering of nationalistic aspirations as the three-party transitional government steers the people towards Independence Day.

    The bloodshed of last November, when as many as 100 people died in a spate of lawlessness in the city, seems to be a thing of the past.

    Campaigning for the three, transitional government parties -- the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA) and the National Front for the Liberation of Angola (FNLA) -- is now mostly confined to slogans on city walls and monuments.

    Yet the power-sharing arrangement between the parties and Portugal is a fragile mechanism. The bitterness of past rivalries lies close to the surface. The fate of Angola's half a million whites remains in the balance although official policy aims for a multi-racial society.

    But, despite all the pressures and uncertainties, the people of Angola appears determined to create their new society on the basis of peace and sharing.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8QSLHG15EFYCR2CAYAAQJA3RE
    Media URN:
    VLVA8QSLHG15EFYCR2CAYAAQJA3RE
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/03/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:43:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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