• Short Summary

    This is further film on the Fairey Rotodyne on which full background information was given under our production number 6574, and contains air-to-air material as well as scenes in the cockpit.

  • Description

    This is further film on the Fairey Rotodyne on which full background information was given under our production number 6574, and contains air-to-air material as well as scenes in the cockpit.

    The latest news on the Fairey Rotodyne, the most revolutionary airliner flying today, is that it may have to be sold out to the Americans. This was the challenge to the Government thrown down today by Fairey Aviation, the pioneer firm who have created and developed the machine.

    The company revealed that with the Rotodyne Britain has a three to five year lead in developing the world's first vertical take-off city-to-city air bus.

    American firms have already approached them to buy up the design rights. But to get the Rotodyne into service within three years would cost from GBP8 million to GBP10 million. And under the Government's ruthless new aircraft policy announced three weeks a go, Fairey's will be expected to find most of the money. They have been asked by the Ministry of Supply to submit their proposals within the next few weeks. If these fail to satisfy the Treasury, then Government support, which has brought the project to the verge of success, will be drastically curtailed or withdrawn completely.

    Under these terms the chances of Fairey's being able to keep the project going themselves are slim. Mr G. W. Hall, Fairey's chairman, has said: "One might well feel that this advanced and unique aircraft should be supported to the hilt by any Government. As we stand today, this is hardly the case."
    "I and my board are determined to push ahead with the Rotodyne. If we find difficulties along one road we shall not hesitate to look for an alternative."
    The Rotodyne was given its first public demonstration at White Waltham today. It showed that it has completely mastered one of the greatest problems in air transport -- the translation from a cumbersome, vertical rising helicopter to a fast, twin-turbo-prop airliner. The change-over was seen only as a brief whirl of smokerings in the sky as jet burners on its rotor blades were switched off. Then, with the blades windmilling silently, the 48-seat machine zoomed over the airfield like any normal plane. At the flick of a switch, the pilot, Squadron Leader Ronald Gellatly, Fairey's senior rotary-wing test pilot, turned it back into a helicopter again and brought it down vertically, backing into a 120 ft parking space.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8KXBTQVNV3ZFION5B59ENURKF
    Media URN:
    VLVA8KXBTQVNV3ZFION5B59ENURKF
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/06/1958
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:04:09:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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