• Short Summary

    Although the contests are largely overshadowed by the Presidential election this fall, voters in the United States will also be picking state and local officials by the thousands when they go to the polls Tuesday (3 November).

  • Description

    Although the contests are largely overshadowed by the Presidential election this fall, voters in the United States will also be picking state and local officials by the thousands when they go to the polls Tuesday (3 November).

    The local race that has attracted the most attention is that for U.S. Senator from New York State between Robert Kennedy, former U.S. Attorney General, a Democrat, and the Republican incumbent Kenneth Keating, who is seeking his second six-year term.

    A principal issue in the campaign is the fact that Kennedy, 38-year-old brother of the late President, had not lived in New York State until he decided to run for the Senate. He is not, in fact, qualified to vote for himself because, although he now rents a home in a New York City suburb, he has not lived in the State long enough to qualify as a voter. This lack of residency on the part of a Senate campaigner is almost unprecedented in American politics and Keating's supporters have made the most of it. They call Kennedy a "carpet-bagger", a derisive term originally applied to Northerner exploiters who swarmed into the South after the Civil War, carrying their few belongings in suitcases made of carpet.

    Keating, who is 64, silver-hatred and has often been described as the very model in appearance of what a Senator should look like, has disavowed the Republican Presidential candidate, Barry Goldwater, and has called attention, by contrast, to his own liberal voting record in the Senate and, before that, in the House of Representatives.

    Keating has said his record in Congress is the principal issue in the campaign. Kennedy--after initially relying on the popularity that rubbed off on him from his late brother--switched tactics and has attacked Keating's record as essentially conservative. Keating counters that Kennedy's selection of "typical" Keating votes is a distortion of his otherwise liberal views on housing, aid to education, unemployment, immigration and other top issues in New York State.

    In any case, most observers, who initially found Kennedy trailing, now see him gaining and they give Kennedy the edge in a close race. A big factor may be the prediction that President Johnson may carry new York State by a huge margin, carrying many Democrats into office on his own popularity.

    A highlight of the campaign were the weeks of debate over whether the two men would debate. They finally did over a New York City radio station, almost on Election Eve. The debate was restrained and unemotional, compared to the talk that preceded it, and added nothing that had not been said before.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8J1JXKRRVS70GU6NV6U62MFD4
    Media URN:
    VLVA8J1JXKRRVS70GU6NV6U62MFD4
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/11/1964
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:48:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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