• Short Summary

    With Britain's ports still paralysed on Sunday (July 26) by the 12-day-old National Dock Strike, two side-effects which arose were further "egg-and-bacon" runs by Strike-breaking fishermen, and congestion at Dover's cross-channel ferry as lorries trying to get to the continent mixed with holidaymakers' cars.

  • Description

    With Britain's ports still paralysed on Sunday (July 26) by the 12-day-old National Dock Strike, two side-effects which arose were further "egg-and-bacon" runs by Strike-breaking fishermen, and congestion at Dover's cross-channel ferry as lorries trying to get to the continent mixed with holidaymakers' cars.

    Fishermen and lorry-drivers continued their unloading operations at Portpatrick in Scotland despite a visit by number of Glasgow dockers, who had driven a hundred and fifty miles from Glasgow in an attempt to end what is probably the most persistent, though minor, loophole in the strike.

    The dockers said they would report the fishermen to the Board of Trade for allegedly breaking safety regulations. So far, the fishermen have brought in more than a million pounds worth of produce.

    The fishermen say the strike-breaking is more profitable than their usual fishing at slack time of year. To keep selling the dairy produce that is breaking the strike-eggs, bacon, butter and cheese, is also said to be important to Northern Ireland's economy.

    On the Northern Ireland side of the Irish Channel there has been fighting between dockers and strike-breaking seamen.

    At Dover, roads became jammed with a mixture of heavy lorries and holidaymakers' cars on their way to the cross-channel ferry.

    Long queues of vehicles became completely immobile, and some of the cars were said to wait more than fifteen fours for a ferry.

    Motoring organisations advised motorists not to got to Dover unless they had booked a crossing.

    The lever that could break the deadlock between the 47,000 dockers on strike and the Port Employers is a report by a Government-appointed Court of Enquiry, due to be published on Monday (July 27).

    Press reports the day before said that it was believed the report would come out in favour of a rise in the basic rate for the dockers.

    The employers have been insisting that it is economically impossible for them to meet the dockers' demands for a basic rate of 20 pounds Sterling a week, compared with their present basic of just over 11 people sterling. Employment Minister Robert Carr is calling representatives of the Dockers and exployers to a meeting in London on Monday (July 27), immediately after the Report has been produced.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8ISY15JQ08GBCDQLQI1EH4V6T
    Media URN:
    VLVA8ISY15JQ08GBCDQLQI1EH4V6T
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/07/1970
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:23:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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