• Short Summary

    The final section of the world's tallest man-made self-supporting structure was placed in position on Monday (31 March) by a Sikorsky sky Crane helicopter in Toronto, Canada.

  • Description

    1.
    TRAVELLING GV OF Tower with spectators on bridge looking at it (2 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    SV Top half of tower
    0.16

    3.
    SV Engineer in bucket lift on mast at top of tower
    0.21

    4.
    SV Helicopter flying towards mast with final section of mast
    0.29

    5.
    SV Spectator watching through binoculars
    0.30

    6.
    SV Final section being positioned over mast
    0.38

    7.
    SV Helicopter lowering section on to mast as engineer ducks into mast (4 shots)
    0.56

    8.
    LV Mast completed with helicopter still hovering above
    1.04


    TRANSCRIPT: "The slim concrete-and-steel tower is a new world landmark. Thousands of spectators lined the city's lake-shore district this morning waiting for the moment when the CN tower would become the highest anywhere. Waiting for the huge Skiorsky sky crane helicopter to approach with a six-ton cargo of steel for the three-hundred-and-thirty-five-foot transmission mast. When it opens next year the tower will have a seven-storey sky-pod with observation decks and a rotating restaurant. For the team of iron workers standing ready to bolt the steel in piece, foreman Paul Mitchell stood stop the tower today a third of a mile high guiding the Skiorsky to the exact position. At the critical moment, Mitchell abandons his precarious perch, ducks back inside the mast and the Sikorsky lowers its load. Weather permitting, the CN tower will be topped of on Wednesday when a thirty-two-foot section of ??? is dropped into place, total height eighteen-hundred-and-fifteen-feet. Chilton Chekey, CBC News."




    Initials BB/2025 NPJ/DW/BB/1955


    SATELLITE TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The final section of the world's tallest man-made self-supporting structure was placed in position on Monday (31 March) by a Sikorsky sky Crane helicopter in Toronto, Canada. The section competed the transmission mast of the New Canadian National Railways' Tower, which overlooked Lake Ontario.

    The completed mast, which 335 feet (102 metres) high, gives the building its final height of 1,835 feat (559 metres), making it the world's tallest free-standing structure. Before its completion, the tallest structure was in the Soviet Union -- a tele-communications tower completed in 1967 at Ostankino in Greater Moscow. The Moscow tower is 1, 749 feet (533 metres) high.

    The Toronto tower was begun in February 1973, as part of lake-front development of 190 acres (77 hectares). The development will take 15 years to complete, and is designed to give the Ontario capital a new commercial core, combining office and apartment accommodation.

    Owned and built by the Canadian National Railways as its central communications and weather station, the tower will also serve the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with six television transmitters and five radio transmitters.

    This film is serviced with a commentary by reporter Chilton Chekov of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. A transcript is provided on page two.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8H100RJR4L7Z1EBLN1FPPVNVE
    Media URN:
    VLVA8H100RJR4L7Z1EBLN1FPPVNVE
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/04/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:04:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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