• Short Summary

    Since it obtained independence from Portugal in 1975, Angola's government has suffered ever-increasing problems in reconstructing the country's economy.

  • Description

    1.
    GV ZOOM New completed apartment blocks in Luanda, Angola
    0.08

    2.
    GV Completed and unfinished buildings (3 shots)
    0.22

    3.
    SV AND INTERIOR Conference of builders and planners in progress at Simagol factory (5 shots)
    0.45

    4.
    GV PAN Chimney stacks at manufacturing plant TO Truck off-loading building material into yard
    0.54

    5.
    SV Workers loading sacks of material in workshed (2 shots)
    1.04

    6.
    SV INTERIOR Engineer inspecting dials on heavy machinery
    1.14

    7.
    SV EXTERIOR Heavy machinery in operation (2 shots)
    1.26

    8.
    SV INTERIOR More heavy machinery
    1.33

    9.
    SV EXTERIOR Chimney stack blowing smoke
    1.36

    10.
    GV Earthmovers loading on to back of truck
    1.44




    Initials SW





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Since it obtained independence from Portugal in 1975, Angola's government has suffered ever-increasing problems in reconstructing the country's economy. After fifteen years of rebellion against colonial rule, the country faced a critical shortage of skilled labour. Internal strife since then has done little to help the reconstruction process. Attacks from outside by South African troops and sabotage by UNITA (National Union for the Total Independence of Angola) from within, have all affected Angola's stability and progress.

    SYNOPSIS: But in Luanda, new building projects have been going ahead. Over 100 of these apartment houses, each with 200 flats, have been handed over to the Angolan capital's population by the government. The main problem is the supply of cement. To make sure the housing programme continues, some 2,000 tonnes are needed every day. This is produced at a government-owned factory where working groups meet each week to discuss how production can be increased. Despite the big housing drive, about two-thirds of the country's population are said to be living in slum conditions. The factory aims to overcome supply problems and produce its target of 305,000 tonnes of cement by the end of 1980.

    Angola has received outside assistance from countries like Cuba and East Germany in setting up health, educational and agricultural projects. And it has received economic help from the Soviet Union and from Western countries. But Angola faces critical economic problems in the near future. There is a shortage of trained personnel, particularly economists, planners, engineers, financial experts and competent managers.

    The country hopes its economy will be boosted by foreign companies joining its exploration for oil. Angola's oil potential could make it one of Africa's richest countries.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8DDWOPGOM9C9LKT18O07MA2MN
    Media URN:
    VLVA8DDWOPGOM9C9LKT18O07MA2MN
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/11/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:44:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment