• Short Summary

    In South Vietnam the work of the International Commission for Control and Supervision (ICCS) is being hampered, not only by internal political wrangles, but by the very conditions that they are supposed to be investigating.

  • Description

    In South Vietnam the work of the International Commission for Control and Supervision (ICCS) is being hampered, not only by internal political wrangles, but by the very conditions that they are supposed to be investigating.

    Last Wednesday (30 May) the members of the ICCS, with representatives from the Viet Cong and Government forces, were to make an on-the-spot investigation of ceasefire violations along route two, a fifty-mile (80 kilometre) stretch of road linking Xuan Loc with the coast.

    However, because of heavy fighting the Government officers refused to allow the ICCS team venture out of their compound. Despite protests from the Canadians, the South Vietnamese officers remained adamant. So the team left with the promise that they would be allowed to return when the fighting was less heavy. In other words, they would be allowed to return to investigate ceasefire violations when the violations were no longer taking place.

    SYNOPSIS: Route Two is a fifty-mile stretch of road connecting Xuan Loc with the coast.

    Unlike most South Vietnamese roads, Route Two is almost deserted, Control of the road has been in dispute for twelve years.

    The communist claim the whole road, while government forces admit that they can only operate over certain stretches. Last Wednesday, members of the International Commission For Control and Supervision (ICCS) visited the disputed road.

    Communist and Government officers were to be taken to ceasefire violation sites to give their versions of the incidents.

    This was to have been the first time the four ICCS delegations and the two combatants would all meet at the actual scenes of fighting.

    Everyone waited at the ICCS compound for permission from the South Vietnamese government to travel down Route Two. But the Government forces said because of fighting on the road they were not able to guarantee the safety of either the ICCS members or the Viet Cong.

    Despite pleas by the Canadian delegates, the Government officers remained adamant that it was too dangerous to make an inspection that day.

    While they waited, the Hungarian and Polish members of the ICCS team took photos of the Viet Cong. The mood among the communists was jocular. Helmets and hats were exchanged.

    Clearly the Viet Cong felt that in this instance they were in the right, and that the visit to Route Two would demonstrate that the Government had established outposts after the ceasefire.

    But the commission was never allowed to pass judgement. The Government officers were adamant, but said that the inspection might be possible another day. So with incidents continuing along Route Two the ICCS was unable to play any role because, ironically, of the incidents continuing along Route Two.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8D0Y5PIPUZ1R5IRPYFLA4BVGH
    Media URN:
    VLVA8D0Y5PIPUZ1R5IRPYFLA4BVGH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    03/06/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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