• Short Summary

    Israeli medical facilities on the Israel-Lebanese border have been enlarged from one doctor and two orderlies to an entire team to cope with the increasing flow of both Moslem and Christian Lebanese seeking attention.

  • Description

    Israeli medical facilities on the Israel-Lebanese border have been enlarged from one doctor and two orderlies to an entire team to cope with the increasing flow of both Moslem and Christian Lebanese seeking attention.

    SYNOPSIS: Over 800 Lebanese men, women and children have been treated by Israeli army doctors since the operation was expanded about a week ago. A sign in Hebrew and Arabic, posted on the side of the road along the security fence on the Lebanese side of the border, indicates where a bate permits crossing into Israel for people in need of help. The original trickle of Lebanese civilians has developed into a regular traffic precipitated by the civil war. Now about 150 Lebanese a day make the trek to the Israeli field hospital.

    The Lebanese who come to the clinic say that since the civil war intensified there has been a near-total breakdown in civilian medical services in Lebanon and doctors have been drafted by the warring factions. They say that in addition basic services such as water supply have not been maintained. The Israeli medical service is being given free of charge and patients in need of specialised care are being transferred to hospitals in various towns in northern Israeli.

    At the hospitals mothers stay with their children and Lebanese patients are being treated in most departments including orthopaedic, surgical, ear-nose-and-throat, and internal medicine. The doctors at the field hospital report that they are counting on staying there for quite a while and that preparations must be made to keep working through the winter.

    Many of the Lebanese patients are pregnant women, who bear their children in the Jewish state - with the help of doctors practising modern obstetric techniques. Some of the newly-born Lebanese citizens owe their lives to the availability of incubators - and at the other end of the scale Lebanese patients who die in Israeli hospitals are placed in coffins and returned to relatives on the other side of the security fencing.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8CHMVYJ2MHIG2SWUEAQ8UTZEG
    Media URN:
    VLVA8CHMVYJ2MHIG2SWUEAQ8UTZEG
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    30/06/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:02:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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