• Short Summary

    The President of Botswana, Sir Seretse khama, died on Sunday (13 July), aged 59.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Fireworks in sky.
    0.05

    2.
    LV & SV Sir Seretse khama takes oath of office and signs book while young people parade past. (4 SHOTS)
    0.29

    3.
    LV & SV Donkey cart along road and villagers walking.
    0.43

    4.
    SV Seretse khama walks in village.
    0.54

    5.
    SV PAN Plaque TO diamond mine workings.
    1.01

    6.
    CU & GV khama (left) watching bulldozers at works. (2 SHOTS)
    1.19

    7.
    CU INTERIOR Uncut diamonds on display.
    1.26

    8.
    SV & CU Khama and his wife voting. (2 SHOTS)
    1.36

    9.
    GV Mr. Paul Hartling, U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees presenting Nansen Award for Seretse Khama's work with refugees.
    1.52

    10.
    GV khama arriving in Lusaka with his wife greeted by Kenneth Kaunda and his wife, as crowds stand by. (3 SHOTS)
    2.08

    11.
    SCU APRIL 1980, Frontline Summit in Lusaka, khama Speaking in English.
    3.07


    SIR SERETSE: "I must hasten to caution however the that we are still very far from the end of the struggle. Our neighbours and friends in Namibia and South Africa are still to experience political in dependence and freedom from minority and racist regimes before they can enjoy the freedoms and the rights of self-determination which our peoples presently enjoy. Southern Africa cannot claim to have achieved total liberation. The struggle must therefore continue until all of us in this region can freely enjoy all the rights to which we are entitled and are able to determine our future and well-being."





    Initials JS/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The President of Botswana, Sir Seretse khama, died on Sunday (13 July), aged 59. He had been undergoing medical tests in London but flew home at the beginning of the month after doctors said there was no more they could do.

    SYNOPSIS: The last day of September, 1966, and British-ruled Bechuanaland became independent Botswana. The new President, Sir Seretse khama talks the oath of office. But behind the ceremony and celebrations there was doubt. Botswana, newly-free, was still bound to South Africa, dependent on it for food, raw materials and an overland route to the sea.

    The early days of independence was a struggle both for the country and its leader. Botswana suffered from lack of finance and a disastrous drought. Sir Seretse was continually dogged by ill health. Ten years later. Sir Seretse had recovered and grown considerably in political stature.

    Part of Botswana's recovery was due to this ... the diamond industry, founded after rich discoveries in 1967.

    This, together with the discovery of copper, transformed the Botswanan economy, making it less reliant on South Africa and enabling it to establish its own currency.

    Oxford-educated and with an English wife, Sir Seretse was out spoken in attacking South Africa's racial policies. In May, 1978, he received a United Nations award in Switzerland for his help in resettling refugees from South Africa and Rhodesia in Botswana.

    Sir Seretse's government firmly aligned itself with the black African nations in condemning both South Africa and Rhodesia. In April this year he addressed the frontline summit meeting in Lusaka, Zambia, and called for the struggle against South Africa to continue.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8C5OUG3T8I7X6BK4KQ7OO5G8X
    Media URN:
    VLVA8C5OUG3T8I7X6BK4KQ7OO5G8X
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/07/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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