• Short Summary

    Argentina's new military president, General Jorge Videla, accused the deposed government of "inefficiency amid generalised administrative corruption and complacent demagogy" in his first speech to the nation from Buenos Aires on Tuesday night (30 March).

  • Description

    Argentina's new military president, General Jorge Videla, accused the deposed government of "inefficiency amid generalised administrative corruption and complacent demagogy" in his first speech to the nation from Buenos Aires on Tuesday night (30 March).

    In a 20-minute television broadcast, General Videla said the military coup staged on Wednesday (24 March) would "not trample on liberty but affirm it, not twist justice but impose it".

    He said the coup was the only alternative to the country's deterioration, but promised no immediate solutions or spectacular changes.

    General Videla said that for the first time Argentina was at the point of defaulting on its foreign debt payments.

    The conservative newspaper La Prensa on Wednesday (31 March) forecast a programme which would strike a "balance between shock treatment and a gradual approach" to overcome a 400 per cent rate of inflation, a huge budget deficit and deep recession.

    The military government has already taken the step of freezing the bank accounts of nearly 200 people, including former president Maria Estela Peron and two of her Peronist predecessors, pending a probe of high-level corruption.

    Reuters News Agency also reports that some 4,000 people have been detained since the coup -- although it has been stressed that this military action is not aimed at any particular party.

    Meanwhile, life in the capital of Buenos Aires has finally returned to normal with people and cars back in the streets.

    The new rulers also ensured that everyone would return to work by banning strikes and industrial action.

    Warnings have been issued against hoarding and black market sales, and shoppers on Wednesday (31 March) reported that sugar, flour and eggs were back on sale.

    SYNOPSIS: Argentina's new president, General Jorge Videla, made his first speech to the nation on Tuesday night. In a 20-minute broadcast from Buenos Aires, General Videla accused the deposed government of "inefficiency" and "corruption". He said the coup had been the only alternative to the rapidly deteriorating situation in Argentina. However, he promised no immediate solutions or spectacular changes to the problems of a 400 per cent inflation rate, a huge budget deficit and deep recession.

    Meanwhile, in Buenos Aires life has returned to normal. Troops guard Government House, and, although there has been left-wing terrorist activity since the coup, shoppers and cars have returned to the streets.

    The conservative newspaper La Prensa keeps the population informed of latest government decisions and forecasts of things to come. The paper has already predicted an economic policy which would strike a "balance between shock treatment and a gradual approach".

    The new military rulers have ensured a full return to work by banning strikes and industrial action. They've also warned against hoarding and selling of goods at inflated prices. Shoppers have already reported that products like sugar, eggs and flour -- that could only be bought on the black market recently -- are returning to the shops.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA89JENPOZU9539L04B954R746U
    Media URN:
    VLVA89JENPOZU9539L04B954R746U
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    02/04/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:13:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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