• Short Summary

    Iranians over the age of 16 go to the polls on Friday (30 March) to vote in a referendum in which they will be asked whether they want an Islamic republic or a monarchy.

  • Description

    1.
    GV back view of Khomeini greeting crowd, turns away and sits on cushion
    0.21

    2.
    GVs panorama of Qom city (TWO SHOTS)
    0.27

    3.
    GV EXTERIOR courtyard with people
    0.32

    4.
    CUs veiled women and priests (FOUR SHOTS)
    0.45

    5.
    GV Shariatmadhari down steps, followed by aide and into doorway
    0.53

    6.
    LS Shahyad monument, Teheran
    0.58

    7.
    GVs modern tower blocks; buildings under construction (THREE SHOTS)
    1.12

    8.
    CU cinema poster PULL OUT TO LS poster on cinema (TWO SHOTS)
    1.22

    9.
    GVs man and woman playing tennis (THREE SHOTS)
    1.28

    10.
    GV newspapers; GV ZOOM INTO CU newspaper headline (TWO SHOTS)
    1.38

    11.
    GV man giving instructions on machine gun
    1.41

    12.
    CU gun; CU man with red mask (TWO SHOTS)
    1.52

    13.
    GV EXTERIOR crowd with raised, clenched fists, armed man runs across street
    1.57

    14.
    SV abandoned military jeep; GVs lien of abandoned tanks; CU tank guns (THREE SHOTS)
    2.08

    15.
    SV & CU young soldiers burning documents and uniforms
    2.18

    16.
    GVs armed civilians in street ( TWO SHOTS)
    2.26

    17.
    GVs women demonstrating (THREE SHOTS)
    2.42

    18.
    GVs armed Kurds demonstrating in Mahabad (THREE SHOTS)
    2.58

    19.
    MS INTERIOR Khomeini speaking to microphone PULL OUT TO LS
    3.12



    Initials KM/1730


    TELERECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Iranians over the age of 16 go to the polls on Friday (30 March) to vote in a referendum in which they will be asked whether they want an Islamic republic or a monarchy.

    SYNOPSIS: It is a question that has been set by the leader of the Iranian revolution, Ayatollah Khomeini, to gain approval for his plans for an Islamic Republic. He wants all Iranians to vote in favour and says that calls for any system other than an Islamic one are treasonous.

    The Ayatollah is now in the holy city of Qom, 150 kilometres (95 miles) south of the capital, Teheran. It is the centre of the Shia sect of Islam that is practised by over 90 percent of Iranians. The city of 300,000 is a stronghold of the religious leaders who have been behind Ayatollah Khomeini's revolution. As yet though, apart from the broad principle of an Islamic republic, no-one knows exactly what kind of government it would be.

    Teheran's Shahyad monument, an impressive sign of the Shah's determination to bring his country's development in line with that of the leading western nations. The modern buildings, some still uncompleted, stand testimony to the economic boom that was under way, financed by Iran's oil wealth.

    What form and direction the economy will take is in doubt. Because of the Islamic revolution many indicators of western life styles, like erotic films, casinos and discotheques have now disappeared. So have scenes like this...tennis courts used by men and women three months ago now stand empty.

    The call for an Islamic republic does have its opponents. Left-wing urban guerrillas who a few weeks ago helped bring down the Shah, now form the main resistance to the Ayatollah Khomeini's plan for a government based on religion. They are seeking fundamental changes in society and in the way country is run. Some are saying that what they call the real revolution is yet to come.

    Inside Iran there is still a measure of disruption. The provisional government is trying to bring order to the chaos caused by months of demonstrations and strikes. The armed forces have largely been disbanded ...many soldiers burnt their uniforms in protest at the Shah...and so far there has been no attempt to set up a regular army. Order is effectively kept by armed young Islamic militiamen.

    Ironically they've had to police demonstrations by women who like them opposed the Shah but now feel that the Ayatollah has deceived them. Under the strict Islamic laws women have lost many of the rights they had enjoyed under the Shah's rule.

    Another group who fought to over-throw the Shah, but now find themselves at odds with Khomeini's plans are the Kurdish minority After a bloody uprising last week they've been promised a say in the drawing up of a new Iranian constitution.

    Observers say most of the 17 million elections will approve Ayatollah Khomeini's aim of an Islamic republic but he is likely to face opposition from a number of groups who disagree with his religious ideals.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA8787J64BUKLZ8EOKPKRS92ZFO
    Media URN:
    VLVA8787J64BUKLZ8EOKPKRS92ZFO
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    27/03/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:12:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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