• Short Summary

    South Africa's Prime Minister P.W. Botha has repeated his pledge to involve the nation's Coloured (mixed race) and Indian communities in a system of power sharing.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Fishing village of Kalk Bay
    0.09

    2.
    GV Docks and fishing boats (3 shots)
    0.28

    3.
    SV Fishermen selling fish on wharf (2 shots)
    0.44

    4.
    SV Fishermen unloading fish from ship (2 shots)
    0.56

    5.
    SV Fishermen on quayside (2 shots)
    1.02

    6.
    SV PAN Meeting of South African Indian Council with Minister of Internal Affairs, Chris Heunig (7 shots)
    1.39

    7.
    SV PULL BACK Cars with anti-SAIC posters (2 shots)
    1.51

    8.
    GV Cars hooting horns in protest
    2.01

    9.
    GV Demonstrators hanging banners
    2.08

    10.
    GV Coloured women going home from work
    2.24

    11.
    CU Dr. Alan Boesak speaking
    3.15


    TRANSCRIPT (SEQ. 11):



    BOESAK: "The large majority of the Coloured and Indian people are saying now, we are not willing to participate in a political system in which the rest of the black community is not incorporated. We are not willing to become junior partners in a system of oppression in which white supremacy remains intact, and it would be well if the Government would be advised to consider this and take cognisance of this fact and people in the Western World themselves must begin to understand that what coloured people and Indian people -- the large majority of them -- want is an open democratic system in South Africa in which all people of this land will be able to participate meaningfully in the economic and political and social structures of our country."





    Initials SW





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: South Africa's Prime Minister P.W. Botha has repeated his pledge to involve the nation's Coloured (mixed race) and Indian communities in a system of power sharing. Meanwhile, some of South Africa's three million coloureds have been engaged in a lengthy battle with the Government to save their homes in the fishing village of Kalk Bay, on Western Cape. Coloureds have lived there for two hundred years, but in 1967 the Government declared the town white. Since then 78,000 coloured people have had to move out to make way for whites. Last month the remaining 6000 families were reprieved by Government order, but there is no guarantee the evicted families will be allowed back. So far there have been some successes. The 800,000-strong Indian community has already elected the South African Indian Council (SAIC). But it was a controversial move, with large numbers of Indians boycotting the election, last November. Dr. Alan Boesak, Dutch Reformed Church chaplain at the Coloured University of Western Cape fiercely attacked the plan.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA86TOPNJLNHIRUKAYT63UM6MKM
    Media URN:
    VLVA86TOPNJLNHIRUKAYT63UM6MKM
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/03/1982
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:16:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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