• Short Summary

    Bobby Fischer clinched the World Chess Championship in Reykjavik, Iceland, on Friday (1 September) when Russia's title-holder Boris Spassky resigned from their 21st game by telephone.

  • Description

    Bobby Fischer clinched the World Chess Championship in Reykjavik, Iceland, on Friday (1 September) when Russia's title-holder Boris Spassky resigned from their 21st game by telephone.

    The 29-year-old chess mater from Brooklyn, New York, won the title by a resounding four point margin, 12 1/2 to 8 1/2 ending the 24 year Soviet possession of the world title.

    This final match began Thursday night. Spassky was in a very strong position until he made a wrong move about three-quarters of the way through the game with one of his pawns.

    Fischer was able to achieve a passed pawn -- tying down Spassky's king -- and by the time adjournment was reached at the 40th move, Fischer's aides felt confident of victory. But, there was still much surprise when Spassky didn't show up to continue the game and phoned in his resignation.

    Spassky's latest mistake added to the series of blunders he made earlier in the championship which helped Fischer to secure his six wins and thirteen draws in the twenty-four game series.

    This VISNEWS report shows Spassky arriving for the final game, and an animation of the sky moves that gave victory to Bobby Fischer.

    SYNOPSIS: The World Chess Championship being fought by the title-holder Boris Spassky against the United States challenger Bobby Fischer in Reykjavik, Iceland ended Friday. Spassky -- who we see here arriving for the beginning of Thursday's match conceded defeat after the evening's play... Spassky, playing White, chess a traditional King's Pawn opening for the twenty-first game and Fischer countered with a Sicilian Defence.

    White presses the attack with his King's Knight, forcing Black to develop his centre cautiously.

    Spassky follows through with his Queen's Pawn, and pawns are exchanged in the first clash of the forty-move battle. White initially commands the centre, with Black developing his pawn advance in a Paulsen Variation of the Sicilian Defence, on his Queens side.

    Fisher's Queen's side has opened out after seventeen moves - With both Queens gone and Knights and Bishops reduced, Spassky secures is pawn line.

    Fischer moves into the attack but, for the time being, looks like losing out with the exchange of a Knight for Pawn and Bishop.

    A raid into Spassky's King's side evens the pawn score.

    And for the sacrifice of his Bishop, Fischer gains a Rook.

    Spassky takes a solitary pawn and has Fischer going for the white pawn line.

    This time, a pawn is taken by both opponents.

    Spassky defends his King's side under the Bishop's cover, but Fischer elects to exchange rooks.

    The last rook remained Fischer's key piece. After forty moves, Spassky had the game adjourned. The next day, he admitted defeat without resuming play.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7XW951X9E85L1IC9CZBLORXJZ
    Media URN:
    VLVA7XW951X9E85L1IC9CZBLORXJZ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/09/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:34:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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