• Short Summary

    In London, Colombian Arturo Gomez Jaramillo told a world coffee conference on Monday (26 September) that coffee drinkers in the main consuming areas may cut their intake by 10 to 10 15 per cent this year.

  • Description

    1.
    CU Coffee beans being picked in Kenya (4 shots)
    0.13

    2.
    SV Coffee on sale in Western supermarket ZOOM INTO poster depicting rising prices
    0.21

    3.
    GV ZOOM IN Coffee warehouse in kenya
    0.27

    4.
    SV Police patrolling ware-house area in Kenya
    0.34

    5.
    SV Workers loading stacks of coffee on conveyor belts
    0.40

    6.
    CU Sign International Coffee Organisation
    0.43

    7.
    SV PAN Delegates drinking cups of coffee
    0.56

    8.
    CU Australian delegate seated in conference hall
    1.00

    9.
    CU New Zealand delegate
    1.02

    10.
    CU Japanese delegate
    1.07

    11.
    CU Nicaraguan delegate, Jose Buitrago, speaking to camera
    1.18

    12.
    GV & CU Brazilian coffee plants affected by frost
    1.31

    13.
    CU Brazilian delegate, Silvio Lima, speaks to camera overlaid with shots of coffee production
    1.57


    BUITRAGO: "In the long run, I think that the probabilities are to stabilise, perhaps at the lower level than the prices are now."



    LIMS: "If there is another frost in Brazil, the price will be three or four times the present level. But I don't believe it's going to happen again, a new, damaging frost in Brazil."



    REPORTER: "If it's a good crop...."



    LIMA: "If it's a good crop, the price will be kept at very reasonable levels, perhaps a little bit more ... in fact, not so much."




    Initials BB/0000



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In London, Colombian Arturo Gomez Jaramillo told a world coffee conference on Monday (26 September) that coffee drinkers in the main consuming areas may cut their intake by 10 to 10 15 per cent this year. Senor jaramillo asked fellow delegates at the opening of the International Coffee Organisation Council's anniversary meeting to consider the impact high prices were making on coffee consumption.

    SYNOPSIS: These are fields of coffee beans in Kenya. Forty-two countries supply almost all of the world's coffee. Most rely heavily in revenues that have come from higher prices.

    The sellers are happier than people in the 24 rich Western nations which import and drink most or the world's harvest. For them, prices have more than doubled in the last year alone.

    Coffee revenue is so important to Kenya that earlier this year police began patrolling railyards and warehouses to try to stop the rise in coffee hijacking and smuggling.

    So the International Coffee Organisation Council has some tough points on the agenda of its 31st session in London. Its 66-country membership is made up of the 42 exporters and the 24 major consumers.

    They'll seek ways of reconciling European and United States pressure for lower prices with Brazil's wish to keep them at present levels or higher. Jose Buitrago of Nicaragua.

    The Brazilians lost most of their 1975 crop to frost and still claim a drastic shortage. They control around 35 per cent of world coffee stocks. Their delegate, Silvio Lima:

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7WSH2JT3N90VEUXC97N92V9ED
    Media URN:
    VLVA7WSH2JT3N90VEUXC97N92V9ED
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    26/09/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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