• Short Summary

    A 48-year-old plane touched down in Jodphur, India on January 1 almost halfway through a commemorative flight to Australia.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Plane taxiing after arrival at Jodphur.
    0.10

    2.
    GVs Members of reception committee waving, traditional musicians and dancers. (3 SHOTS)
    0.29

    3.
    GV Captain Jan Plesman and other members of crew get out of plane, are greeted and turbans and garlands placed on heads. (5 SHOTS)
    1.10

    4.
    GVs Musicians seated on ground playing dancers performing, crew watch display. (7 SHOTS)
    1.50

    5.
    GVs Decorated camel and camel cart. (2 SHOTS)
    1.58

    6.
    GVs KLM DC-2 stationary of tarmac. (2 SHOTS)
    2.05

    7.
    SCU Captain Jan Plesman speaking. (English SOT)
    2.38

    8.
    GV Plane on tarmac.
    2.44


    SPEECH TRANSCRIPT:



    PLESMAN: (SEQ 7) "If you want to know something about the performance, the engines are not original any more. We have two 1,000 horse-power engines. We are only permitted to apply 875 horse-power because of the structure. So in fact they are de-rated, but it givers a pretty high speed of 155 nautical miles per hour, which is better than a DC-3. The altitude we can reach is above 18,000 feet."





    Initials PD/JRS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: A 48-year-old plane touched down in Jodphur, India on January 1 almost halfway through a commemorative flight to Australia. The flight was undertaken to mark the famous MacPherson Robertson London-to-Melbourne marathon race in 1934. The plane, a DC-2 currently on loan to Dutch airline KLM, was captained by jan Plesman. He is a grandson of the original DC-2 pilot albert Plesman, who the handicap section of the 1934 race. Plesman and his crew were treated to a traditional welcome at jodphur by native dancers after being greeted by Rajasthani state governor, Air Chief Marshall O.P. Mehra. The DC-2 is the last of its type still operational. It set off from Amsterdam on December 18 flying to London for the official start. In 1934,the original KLM DC-2, called "Uiver" (which means "stork" in Dutch) came second in the speed section of the race won by British flyers Campbell Black and Charles Scott. The British pair completed the 20,000-kilometre (12,400 miles) journey in 63 hours and 23 minutes in their Comet. Plesman and his crew are due to land in Melbourne of February 3. they were planning to stop for more courtesy visits on the second half of the long journey, at new Delhi, Allahabad, Calcutta, Rangoon, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Jakarta and Selaparang. In Australia they hope to land at Darwin, Albury and finally Melbourne itself. The DC-2 was the world's first aircraft to have automatic steering, a forerunner of the modern automatic pilot system. Equipped originally with tow Wright Cyclone engines and the then rare retractable undercarriage, the DC-21 was also the first all-metal plane. Plesman said his plane had been adapted with two modern engines, could fly at an altitude of 5,486 metres (18,000 feet) and had a top speed of 285 kilometres per hour (155 nautical miles per hour).

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA7WE1QXEHP33TY69FIVN6TG9E5
    Media URN:
    VLVA7WE1QXEHP33TY69FIVN6TG9E5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    04/01/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:44:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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